Special Guest Expert - Robert White

Special Guest Expert - Robert White: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

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Brigitta Hoeferle:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back their dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question. And the answers are right here. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle, and this is the Success Pattern Show. And welcome everyone to on this beautiful Tuesday. It is my honor, my privilege to be here and welcome you to the success pattern show where we put the do into learn do teach. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle. I'm the founder of the Success Patterns Movement and the CEO of the Center of NLP and people ask me what is the success patterns show? Or to put it in my dear friend Johnny Carson's words, who's from Australia? And he says, Pattern took me forever to understand that he's actually meaning patterns. John It's patterns. So the definition of pattern is an example, for an example for others to follow. And can we agree that success can be followed if you can define it, if you know what success means to you, because success is an interesting thing. Can we agree on that? It shapes the success, meaning shapes within each individual person, success seeker. And it's not limited to one's business or personal life. It can be either or. It can be both because success is a unique concept we give you here in the success pattern. Show the scaffolding to build your own empire. In this show, we are decoding the patterns that led to other people's success of our guest experts. So you can then encode it in your own success today as humans were hardwired for hands on application by living teachers. And we're clearly not theoreticians because they talk a good game. We are here grandmasters at work, which means you're at the right place at the right time. Give yourselves a round of applause for being here at the right place at the right time. And one of the laws of success that I teach states that success is modeled.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And that's what we're here. That's what we're going to do with our with our guest experts, our success patterns, guest experts, because success is already yours. So stay tuned. At the end of the show, we have a very special gift for you that our guest expert has brought specifically for you. You don't want to miss it. We have a great show for you today. I have an incredible person that I just spent about a half an hour just learning about this gentleman that I have not heard or not met before. I heard about him before, but I've never met him before. His name is Robert White, and he's been there and done that with business success and also business failure. And I guess in order for you to know what to do, it's really good for you to know what not to do and actually learn from that. So another success law that states there is no failure, only feedback. Robert White, who is my guest expert for you today, utilizes rich personal history of entrepreneurial success as an executive mentor and leadership trainer to develop extraordinary personal leadership skills, his focus, alignment and commitment. And boy, is he committed. I mean, it's just it just oozes out of him. Wait till you get to meet him. He found it and let training industry success stories of life spring and arc international. And he has certified a combined 1.3 million 1,300,000 graduates through his trainings. He's lived and worked in Japan and Hong Kong, mainland China for 23 years, and he authored essays for award winning photo journal One World, One People. And his best seller, Living an Extraordinary Life, is available in English and in traditional and simplified Chinese. There's an audio file magazine awarded Roberts Audio Home Study Program Achieving Extraordinary Success in 2011 Earphones Award for Best Spoken Word Personal Development Program. Oh, my goodness. You guys, you are in for a treat. Ladies and gentlemen, will you stand on your feet and help me welcome Mr. Robert White. Hello, Robert. So good to have you here.

Robert White:
Well, thank you, Brigitta, and thank you for the wonderful introduction. You know, it was one of those where I'm listening to and I'm thinking, I can't wait to hear what I have to say.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I know that feeling.

Robert White:
But I you know, the most special thing about me and why I'm eager to be with you is that I'm a very average person. You know, I struggle with my weight. I've been remarkably good at getting married, remarkably bad at staying married. I'm not so disciplined sometimes. I mean, I have a lot of weaknesses. I think a strength that I have is that early on, I started to notice patterns. And myself and and others. And I found out that there were patterns that work and patterns that are very dysfunctional. And, you know, it's usually better to do the ones that work and see if you can minimize the ones that are dysfunctional. So that's kind of.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
That's right. So. So, Robert, you're telling me you're not a robot?

Robert White:
Very human.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Very human. Am I glad? Because we don't want to hear from robots. We want to hear from real people with real stories, with real feedback. I'm not I'm not going to call them failures because they're all great feedback. Right. And and they have made and I speak out of my own experience. They've made us rich. They have made us rich in information that we can learn from. And you know, as we were talking before we got on the show today, you shared with me that while you were in the past, while you lived in China, that you trained over 100,000 people in a short time frame. And I also know and I want you to talk a little bit about that. You're an introvert, and it sounds like you're almost an introvert that learned to be at times an extrovert. Like I'm an extrovert that has learned to actually sometimes for my own sake, to it's good to be an introvert. So tell me about those rituals, those patterns that you have learned to lead you to where you are today, and that will lead you into the future of what's what's about to happen in your life.

Robert White:
Like a lot of my background came from a simple decision. When I was 27 years old, a friend went out to California and did what a lot of people were doing at that time, which is he attended one of the early human potential movement trainings, and he came back and his life changed dramatically. And I, I witnessed that and I got through my own resistance and finally did the seminar myself and figured out all these years later, it's a bit of a cliche, but my life changed and permanently. That experience stays with me till today. And my life improved. My business improved. I ended up getting into that business and and loving it. So. But in that training, one of the things I learned is that from childhood, in addition to being wired as an introvert, I learned about being extremely critical and demanding. So in building a company, that's a pretty bad pattern to have and attracting and retaining the best people. You don't you if you show up as criticism, most of the time, generally people don't want to be around you. And so I'm kind of simplifying what happened for me there, but that was a big part of it. And that that has served me well all of my life is to learn to take a deep breath and realize that I'm in charge of the atmosphere, that that gets created around me. And if there's a secret to my success, it's attracting great people and empowering them to do what they do best. And that's led to an incredible life that I've enjoyed.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
How do you how do you attract those people? I mean, it's it's it sounds easy. It sounds exciting. How do you attract those kind of people that you want to work with? How do you know?

Robert White:
Look, if I look at the problems that my current clients are facing, many of them are facing the challenge of attracting great people today, particularly younger people. And. Peter Drucker, the famous management theorist and author, is credited for saying this. But I actually have discovered that many other people said it before he did. And that is that strategy or excuse me, culture eats strategy for breakfast. For breakfast that the culture you create is way more important than anything, any strategy, any product offering, whatever. And if you take a look at the culture of an organization and it's key to attracting people. One of the things that happened as a result of the Internet uber presence in our lives is today young people can go online and with any major organization, they can find out your culture. They can find anonymous postings from people that already work in the company that are considering joining about culture. Does the does the company have a clearly articulated purpose? And are they moving steadily toward it, toward realizing it? Are they do they have a compelling vision, not just one that's good, maybe for a few of the stockholders or for the CEO. But is it a vision that attracts talented people that they want to be part of that? And then do they have values that are positive, life affirming values? Something in NLP I know works with quite extensively. And. But are they living though? Are they walking the talk? You know, I cannot tell you. Yeah, I can't tell you the number of companies I've visited and talk with the CEO where I'll ask about that. Those three things of the purpose, the vision and the values. And then he shows me the poster on the wall or some study from McKinsey or a coffee cup or some gimmick. They're daily reminders. I have all these sayings on them, and yet when I dig into the company and talk with, let's say, the top 20 people, I find out that they're they're not living their purpose, vision and values. They just it's just for show. And so today, attracting great people, I think, more than ever, requires that attraction, attraction, effort around clarity and authenticity and integrity around your purpose, vision and values.

Robert White:
That's how you get the best people. And quite frankly, I paid better than anybody in the industry, you know, and I forced people to take vacations. And with our work where people get so passionate about it, we had to set rules about how long they worked each day. It wasn't about getting them to work longer hours, just getting them to work shorter hours and go home, take care of their family, or participate in the charity outside our work or a community involvement. And but that was one of our values, was the health and well-being of our staff. So we either acted on it or we didn't. And but, you know, it is true that on this conceptual side, purpose, vision values are extremely important as a foundation to attract good people. But then you better pay them. Well, you better treat them well. You better be fair. You better be willing to fire those people that are inconsistent with your values. It's it becomes quite practical.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. And it becomes quite multi level in in in that strategy itself. So if you've ever listened to anything that I teach, I always talk about the win win win, right. When we are like when I'm invited to come speak from stage and someone says, Do you have something to sell? I would say, Yeah, I have an incredible program that that helps people, but it's not just something that I sell. It is something that I know is so beneficial to people in their lives. So it's not just one win for, Hey, buy my product, buy my service, and here's the link and now everyone go do it right. That would be only one win for myself. There's got to be a second win, a win win that we often hear of. But then there's that third one and I really harp on that. It's that win for you, a win for me, and a win for the greater good. So sending them home early so they can be with their family or being involved in community and giving back in the community or whatever it is that they might be doing. There's that third win, there's that that that incredible third aspect that gives that kind of evolves the whole purpose behind just working. How do you create those win, win, win scenarios and your own life moving forward and perhaps even by growing and learning and building better, greater businesses?

Robert White:
Well, you know, my company, the most recent large company, was called Arc International, which was an acronym for Awareness, Responsibility and Communication that you need to wake up that awareness piece and then take personal responsibility for your life and your actions. And then finally, you better develop mastery in communications. And my former wife, Diana, has a lot of wisdom and is really articulate in a very special way. And she uses a different expression for awareness, which I like, and that is to develop a higher state of noticing, of really noticing yourself first internally, but also noticing your environment, really noticing the people around you. And that's been a lesson that I've had to learn over time. I think I'm reasonably good at it today. But boy, there are times when I've been, you know, the classic expression, having the consciousness of a brick and I've been there. I mean, I know, I know the damage that that leads to. And for a leader particularly or for a parent or for somebody involved in the community, can you really notice what's happening within you and around you? And the key for us in our work and you ask me during our pre talk about methodology, you've got to have an entry into people if you're going to work in the transformational space. Our entry is your feelings, your emotions. And we use lighting, we use sound, we use trickery, we use music, we use poetry. We, you know, it's more eastern than Western our approach because what we want to get to is your ideal resource state. Does that sound like familiar language to you?

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Sounds very familiar language to me. Yes. You're speaking you're singing my song and speaking my language.

Robert White:
Well, in the early days of NLP programing, we brought in a very famous person in that field and had her work with our trainers. And I was a student, so I'm still a student of Laura. And I'm I see the value in the work and has a very direct implication for anybody that wants mastery in communication. And, you know, it's groundbreaking work. So very.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Cool. It's the metta program of our communication. Absolutely. And I love that higher state of noticing. And the noticing, if we if we look at the word noticing notice is something that we see. It is something that we can also hear. So, you know, my big thing is listening. My big thing is tuning into what is said and what is not being said. Right. So there's that there's a piece of that noticing.

Robert White:
What's the meaning behind the words? That's the key. And if if you're working in that kind of trusted advisor space that I that I work in with executives is I want to know what they say and what they think and what they feel. But I also I'm kind of listening for the meaning behind all of that because it's meaning that really moves people and causes lasting change. And attitudes, habits and behaviors.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And the behaviors is exactly what we actually have an influence over with our communication. When we notice, when we're in that heightened state of noticing and and communicating on a quality level, not just communicating for the sake of communicating, but communicating on a quality level. I love the responsibilities that you touched on as well. What humbles you?

Robert White:
Well, certainly I think the more. You know, you can talk about academic learning. You can talk about behavioral learning, experiential learning. And there's another aspect that I'm not an expert in, but I'm a student that's spiritual learning. I think the thing that humbles me is realizing that one of my friends, Arjun Sen, says that we are one of one 7 billion people on the planet and we are unique and there's nobody else like us really in every aspect. And so that's humbling when you get that, yes, I've got some special gifts and I can choose to express them or not. Yes, I have some abilities, some some experiences that I can contribute, but I'm one of one. I am I'm a member of a world family. And I think if you really get that at a spiritual level, that well, that brings humility. Obviously, I had a major failure in my life. I fired 240 people and closed 15 offices and took a big hit to my reputation. So that's humbling. And frankly, divorce is humbling. If you take it seriously and if you take responsibility for it. So I think there's a lot of things that can humble you. We seem to have an epidemic of narcissism in our country right now.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. Boy, you said that, right.

Robert White:
And part of the I think the enemy of narcissism is is putting yourself in situations that humble you, that cause you to stop and go, wait a minute. This is this show is not all about me. There's there's a community here, my family, my my colleagues.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
There's that third win.

Robert White:
Yes. And and not because it's a government rule or regulation. I think any kind of change that comes without changing hearts and minds is just totally useless. You know, the on video this morning, I saw people on airplanes cheering because the mask mandate was dropped. And, you know, that that's that's going against the flow, that's going against the media, that's going against our government. But people have a kind of natural knowing when they tune in to it. And when you tune in to what's really true for you, I think that's when real growth takes place. That's when humility fits. I've also been guilty of too much humility. You know, I didn't put my name on any of my companies I worked for in the background. I know that I was less effective. I was more effective and I was less effective because of that choice. And so the humility part can be false and it can be, but it can also be unrecognized celebration of self. So that's been part of my journey.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So being humble and being in humility is not is not the same, clearly. And it's all in a dose from what I'm hearing of all of the people that you you've always been this very unique one person, Robert White. Well, if we would look, there's probably several Roberts White Robert White's out there, but only one one with this specific fingerprint of all of the things that you have done and the people that or the characteristics that carry Robert White as he's sitting here right now, which three characteristics do you want to move into the future with you as you are on maybe new endeavors, maybe bigger endeavors, maybe the same only different endeavors. If you could choose three aspects, what would they be? Three characteristics.

Robert White:
Wow. I didn't know you're going to come up with difficult questions for Greta that make me really think. Well, the first one that comes to mind and important to me is vulnerability. I think particularly for men, the way we show up in terms of our image often gets in the way of accomplishing what we really want to accomplish in relationships and in leadership roles. So we learn to hold back information, particularly information that might embarrass us or have have it threaten our image in any way, these carefully constructed images that we create. So the first answer to your question would be, I want to increasingly develop my willingness to be vulnerable to to really tell the truth, be authentic with people. You know, that the great my great teacher on that I've never met, of course, but along with 50 million other people, I've watched Brené Brown's TEDx talk on vulnerability. And I think that's like primer that every executive should watch maybe multiple times and read a couple of her books because she teaches from the standpoint of her own journey. And that's very, very powerful. She's she is an academic. She's done the research. But where it when it comes down to that rubber meets the road thing. She teaches from a standpoint of her own experience and it's so real and then she's so funny. You know, the woman is probably never told a joke in her life and she's hilarious. So I think that's a vulnerability. I think, you know, in my mentoring programs, I have a filter that I look at organizations and executives through and I check off these three things. So that would mean I'm going to four things in your quote with your question. But it's focus, alignment and commitment. If I'm working with an executive or with their teams, I want to know how clear is the focus, what it is we're up to here. You know what? What is it that we are working on and and we absolutely own? And then the second part is alignment. Particularly today, workforces are diverse. They're divorced, diverse, and in gender and in faith and in ethnically and in age. And that particularly in that age piece.

Robert White:
Younger people have a different set of values and desires, and the culture has taught them that they can have it all, you know. So, you know, you can sit on the sidelines and be the grumpy old guy, which I am sometimes, and say, Well, that's wrong. But if you're the leader and you're trying to attract the best and brightest, you better make room for people that don't share. You're exactly the same values. That's where alignment comes in. You know, the that as long as we are moving toward the same compelling vision. Well, you know, I hate to quote Mike Tyson, that communist killer, but, you know, he said, let a thousand flowers bloom. And that's that is against what a lot of people are taught about leadership in the Western world is, you know, we want to control everything. We want everybody to think alike, all act alike. You know, the classic thing and when I was growing up was the IBM guys and the white shirt and the tie and the suit jacket always on, you know, all of that. Well, that's a metaphor for a whole lot of conventional thinking. And it doesn't work today for everybody, for some people, but particularly for younger people. It doesn't work as well. And so can you create a workplace that allows for some difference, some diversity while pursuing the same goal? Yes. Set of goals. And that's that's the alignment piece. And then finally, you know, you mentioned this gift that I offer to people that whenever I appear like this, that includes our eight principles. And one of the things I say when I'm teaching that material personally is that the eighth principle is commitment. And if you really get it, you can forget the seven, the other seven that ultimately we do what we're actually committed to doing. And so if you look at organizations today and what I'm working on, it's to increase focus, alignment and commitment with my clients, which means, of course, I have to.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So and I mean, you do have a choice, but it would be it would be beneficial for you to actually live what you're teaching, because now we have that alignment again, right? We're being congruent with what we say we're going to do and what we are actually going to do. And speaking of and you have great feedback here, I get thumbs up, I get wows, I get love. Robert White, I get all of these great feedbacks from, from our listener. Before we go into the gift that you brought, what is your and I'm pretty sure it's just like when I get that question, I'm like, Oh my gosh, I have to pick one. Although I do have one book in mind. What's your favorite book?

Robert White:
You know, I've said this so many times, I'd like to come up with a new one, except the favorite one is still Man Search for Meaning Viktor Frankl and in a sense, his memoir of being in the death camps, what he learned about survival and thriving and About Life. That's that's my favorite book I had when I released my book. First of all, for 20 years, people told me to write my book. And I had I had a zillion excuses for it, and I'm good at it, you know, and coming up with a good story. And I got kind of shamed into writing it by Stephen Covey's book, The Seven Habits Book, because a lot of that content is actually our content, you know, that we developed over the years and and a healthy dose of Mormon faith. So that's a pretty good book. I mean, there's some really good stuff in it, but it's all 22 million copies. And I went and then people started coming to me and they say, Well, I went to the Covey leadership program. I'd say, Oh, what you did, you get value? They say, No. I say, Well, then why did you go? You know, I'm sure you're you went because your friends told you to go, right? Yes. I said, well, why did you go? I read the book, so I wrote the book, but I'm really nervous, right? I'm just super nervous because it's a very public thing for an introvert to release a book. You know, you've got to get out and promote it or have a garage full of books. And the great thing that happened and my joke is that happened for about 18 minutes, is some really great people that I really respect. Loved my book. You know, Ken Blanchard loved my book or Jimmy Colonna or, you know, a lot of names that you would recognize. And they ordered the copies for their families and friends. And, you know, it's great. And but it was all about 18 minutes of feeling good. And then they would say, well, but I was disappointed in one thing. And I, of course, would say, what disappointed you? And they would say, the book is not about you and your extraordinary life, and it's not. It's about our graduates and their interaction with our material. So it's real world stuff. I think that's why it's become a bestseller.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And applaud you for.

Robert White:
That. But there's one chapter that's about me and now I don't reveal that in the book. So this is the big reveal, right? The chapter is the most limiting belief. You are not enough. You are not enough. And I lived most of my life, including right up to the time I wrote that book with that belief about me. And I know where it came from. I've done enough therapy. I've been in enough trainings. You know, I had a hypercritical, angry, violent mother, an alcoholic father. I was told I was not enough repeatedly, in spite of evidence, that I was up to something in the world and I could accomplish some things. And in working with these super fantastic executives that I work with now, they're the smartest, the brightest, the most driven, the hardest working. You know, a lot of people are get into this well, they make too much money. They don't make enough for what they deal with. Right. And so I'm just in awe of them. And I can't tell you the number of them that when we really get into it, they do that out of a reaction to I am not enough, you know, in an extreme form. It's called the imposter syndrome. But even the people that would not qualify as imposter syndrome, they have this nagging fear that they're not enough. They haven't done enough. And one of the things that I'm working on. Are you familiar with Eric Donovan? Is that a familiar.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I'm not. No.

Robert White:
I think a lot of people are big are going to become familiar with Eric. He runs a financial advisory company. There's about a million of those in America down in some little unknown city in Louisiana. He runs on Christian principles, doesn't go to church, but he runs it on Christian principles. And his focus is family wealth and transfer of family wealth. However, if you're not willing to up your philanthropic giving, you're not going to be a client of Eric's because he considers that to be a responsibility of of people. That. And then he looks at. What gets in the way of that. And it's I'm not enough that I never have enough money. I'll never have enough power. I'll never have enough. And that stops them from being fully human because it's fully human to bring people along with you, to take care of the people in your community, you know, all of that stuff. Eric is so clear about that stuff. I'm learning from him about that and.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I want to have him on my show.

Robert White:
That that would be wise, actually. And also, he's he's incredible personality. Like I'm talking in a really positive sense. I'm not talking about Hollywood fake. I mean, he's the real deal. Great husband, father and businessman, you know, nice combination. So that's part of my goal in working with the executives today is to have them see their impact in a much broader way because they know how to get stuff done. You know, I came back to the US in 1986 from that long stay in Japan and one of the things I wanted to plug into the community and I chose Colorado, even though I've never lived here and I knew only a handful of people. And so one of the things I did, I read in the newspaper about this guy, this pastor who was giving away Christmas excuse me, Thanksgiving food baskets, you know, a turkey and all the fixings. And and he was doing this with such numbers. It's just it was mind blowing. So I networked around. I found out how to volunteer, and I went down and there were hundreds of people volunteering and I handed out turkeys and unpack boxes and get all that kind of stuff. And but what was amazing to me was at the same time, the corporation, Wal Mart, was being savaged in the press and I lived in Japan all those years. It's all new to me. Like, why are people taking on this company? Seems to be they sell products for good prices and poor people can buy stuff there. And you know, I'm not an expert about that, but like, where are they getting all this bad press? And then you take a look at this guy. The the pastor that did this was called Daddy Bruce. His name was Bruce and they called him Daddy Bruce. And Daddy Bruce had recruited Wal Mart to handle all of the logistics in the background to serve thousands of people. Wow. I mean, a lot of people say, yeah, I want to help people. Right? Well, when you do it on that kind of scale, you better have somebody that has some big trucks and forklifts and people that know how to drive the truck and how to drive the forklift and how to keep things cold and not have food spoiled.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And and not and not slip out the back door and say, Oh, I said I wanted to help, but this is too much. I don't want to do this. I'm out because there are enough people out there doing that as well.

Robert White:
So my point is not that I'm this I don't even know enough about Wal-Mart to be a huge fan. But what I saw that day was such excellence and leadership, and they're quiet about it. There wasn't any big sign that said, supported by Wal-Mart. You know, you could see it was their trucks and it was their people in uniform, but they just did it. So I think that's the model for the future. I think I don't I'm not a big believer in government getting things done and charities are just being. I think their focus, alignment and commitment are questionable. I think business and business people are the answer.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And when when.

Robert White:
When.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
There's that. Exactly.

Robert White:
And and because they get their staff involved, the staff becomes more proud of their company and can brag about it to their friends. And then recruiting becomes easier. You know what I'm saying here? This is selfish about it's saving a good cause, you know, and it's beautiful.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I want to have him on my show.

Robert White:
Well, we as business people, we need to recognize our strengths, what we do well, and that it's needed. It's wanted. It's actually the key to a better future for all.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. Wise, wise words from Robert White. Robert, we're getting to the end of our show, and I want people to plug into your wisdom to get in touch with you. How do they get in touch with you?

Robert White:
Well, my website, extraordinary People.com is a good start. And on there, you can buy my book. You get a signed copy. If you go to Amazon or all of those other places, you can still get a copy and you can get the digital version Kindle, which with Amazon, it's running about ten Kindle sales to every physical book. So the world has changed, right? But the other thing you can do there is you can register for my weekly extraordinary minute easing. It's I've been doing it for over ten years. There's thousands of people that fortunately that read it. It is timeless wisdom. A comment from me. And it's all designed to be read in one minute or less. And what you get when you register for that is a 28 page document that I've been working on for 40 years, which is about achieving extraordinary success in your life and your work and in your personal life. And included in that is a full explanation of those eight principles and a self assessment. A little exercise you can do. It's one it's the only thing I do that where I recommend that people act non ecologically because I recommend they print it out and because it's like a book and it gives you the chance to take that little exercise and go through it, you'll learn a lot. So those are two ways.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
The big thing, I will print it out.

Robert White:
Good. Look, I. I just. I want to be in touch with more people. I think I've got something to give, and I think people that get into relationship with me always enrich my life in various ways. So.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I feel so much richer after our hour together today. I know you guys only had him for, like, 40 minutes today. I got Robert a little bit longer than you guys. Go ahead. Go to WW. Extraordinary People.com slash power dash principals dash for dash leadership dash success. I'm going to say that again, extraordinary people.com slash power principles for leadership success. And there's a dash in between each word. Go ahead and get your get your 28 page PDF, your book on Extraordinary Leadership. Robert It was such an honor. It was such an incredible time. I have learned many great things from you today. Thank you for showing up in a really, really big and authentic way. I appreciate you. I can't wait to have you coming back. And for everyone else that is tuning in again next Tuesday, same time, same place. Thank you for being here. This was the best pattern show. Thank you for tuning in to the Success Pattern Show at www.TheSuccessPatternShow.com, my name is Brigitta Hoeferle.

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Robert White

Robert White utilizes a rich personal history of entrepreneurial success as an Executive Mentor and Leadership Trainer to develop extraordinary personal leadership skills, focus, alignment, and commitment. Robert founded and led training industry success stories Lifespring and ARC International with a combined 1,300,000 graduates. He lived and worked in Japan, Hong Kong and Mainland China for 23 years. He authored the essays for the award-winning photo journal One World One People and his best seller Living an Extraordinary Life is available in English, Traditional and Simplified Chinese. AudioFile Magazine awarded Robert’s audio home study program Achieving Extraordinary Success its 2011 Earphones Award for “Best Spoken Word Personal Development Program.”

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