Special Guest Expert - Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso

Special Guest Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso: this eJwljltrwkAQhf9KmIc-RUNuGgNShEILlUItpfoUhs1oFzc7S3bWEMT_3oS-nst3zh0UWyErjYyOoIYdxKCtF7SKGt1Cna3LKsvzMgYVvHAXPPX_xipdFWUWAyrFYSLMYl5tynQdw1mTaRuL3cw8a0MT9jpgf_FQ3yH0ZpJ_RZyvk2QYhuWF-WIInfZLxV3S9vpGyS1L5qpP0qo5Vcf1ccx3xemwL674zovxp6RdenLB3T6f0ci2o1bjk-fQK9q2PFjD2H5PUzGIFjM_-XKkNJroNZCX6AOFoheK9hi98YiLA42WPU_5M_cdylToXAGPxx_XhmI6:1njhwN:AebA3WownjzOZd8KmlVYH_Ceplk video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back their dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question, and the answers are right here. My name is Brigitta and this is the Success Pattern Show. And welcome everyone. You are here at the right place at the right time. Happy Tuesday. It is time for the success pattern show where we go and look at some of the lessons of what worked and what didn't work. And we're here at the center of NLP where we put the do in learn, do teach. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle, the founder of the Success Patterns Movement and the CEO of the Center of NLP. And I have a few other hats. Being the wife of the culture guy is one of them, and being a mom to Emily and Anna, which is my highest purpose, is the other. And I big, big shout out to my girls who are just absolutely incredible human beings all in their own right. So, you know, I get people they ask me when I have a conversation around the success patterns movement, this success pattern show they say, what is a success pattern? Well, let's look at the definition of pattern is an example for others to follow. And can we agree that success is an interesting thing? It shapes its meaning within each individual success seeker, if you will, because it's not limited to either business or personal life. It is a unique concept and in this success pattern show we give you the scaffolding to build your own empire in this unique concept. Because when you can decode a pattern that led to other people success a.k.a our guest experts, you can then, as the listener, encode it for your own success today. And because we're hardwired for hands on application by a living teacher, we're here to give it to you straight from the source. Our guest experts and I am so excited about the guest expert that I have today.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And I say this every week and it's true every week. I am super, super happy and honored for the person that I am bringing to you as a guest expert today. As we are modeling these success patterns, you know what? When we model success patterns, it's not all sunshine, right? There are going to be and we have people we've talked about this before that have gone through the shadows, through the hard times. And I think we all have in order to get to the next level of success. Success is yours. At the end of this show, we're going to have a special gift for you. So stay till the end. Today's a great show. We got an incredible person that is here and we're going to talk about mindset. We're going to talk motivation because those are the key factors of success. And we're going to go deeper. And this person that I'm about to introduce to you is he loves to work on the inner game. So the outer works and I'm paraphrasing what he told me, but I love that inner and outer game and it starts with our inner game, so it shows up on the outer. His purpose is to use his knowledge, creativity and humor to uplift and inspire and educate others. And Oh boy, are you in for a ride. His journey to self mastery is a beautiful to not just listen to it, but to also model and to learn from. So, ladies and gentlemen, with a big standing ovation, I bring to you the one, the only, Nate De La Hoya from Carpet Tatum podcast. Hey.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Thank you so much for the wonderful intro Brigitta.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, I'm so excited that you're here with me now. Nate and I, we go, I'm going to say way back, but you're not even that old, so I can't say that.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
2016 maybe. I believe we've known each other for about five or six years now.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
That sounds about right. That sounds about right. And when we met, Nate and I were both learners and and I would say, Nate, that's still true today.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Absolutely. I feel like my hunger for knowledge has never ceased. And it's come from a very young point of view, because when I was very, very young, I felt like the world was very interesting and how it was set and how I am built and how when I'm comparing myself to other kids, I was like, Why is this kid like this? Why is this person like this? Why is this teacher like that? And since from a very, very young age, I've just been curious of like, how do people work? Because to better understand others is to better understand oneself. And it was always been a journey of self-discovery and self mastery that I've now been able to really sharpen the sword and really get into deeper. Conversations, deeper understandings. But that hunger for knowledge is just never given up since very, very, very young.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So was that fostered through your through your home life?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
I'm not 100% sure. There was something about the way my parents made love during the time I was conceived that made me the way I am. I don't understand what it is, but from a very, very young age, I could. I knew that I was very self aware and I just didn't fit in with my peer groups because I was having these ideas and thoughts that were just too high level for people in like second grade. Right. And it's weird for a young kid to be able to hold conversations with adults, but I've always had, like, the gift of gab. So. I this awareness that I have that people are a certain way, I guess it really comes from like trying to understand like why my parents were the way they were, why my grandparents were the way they were. I just had this need to know, to understand why people behave the way they do. And it's turned into from like, okay, how do other people act and how do I act? Because of course, it was you know, I can see people doing actions and saying things whether constructive or destructive. But then I never turned it on myself until I really discovered. Personal Development. The Millionaire Mind Experience. Neuro linguistic programing. All these things that I later learned in life ended up really helping with not only understanding how people work around me, but how my brain is currently working, how it chooses to see the world, and how it chooses to see how I choose to see myself. Situations, relationships I feel like and I genuinely believe that everything in my current reality stems from the thoughts that I have about my reality. And that little bit of shift and focus and that little bit of knowledge really puts the power back into the hands of the people. And this is my mission to then teach others the same thing. The power to shape everything around you starts with the inner game, the mind, and I'm sure you can relate to that too.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I relate to that very much so. And that's why we have such great conversations. And I'm curious because I educate like you. You educate adults, I educate adults, but I also educate children. And I'm always curious, what did the adults around you when you were little, what did they do? Because if we could model that and if we could almost package that and give it to other adults, hey, it worked. Whatever Mom and Dad have made did it worked? So let's let's let's take that and let's package it and give it to others and go rather than you talking down to your child or telling them that they're stupid or, you know, diminishing their life or whatever you want to call it, do what Nate and Nate's parents did.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
I probably wouldn't recommend that because they they fought constantly. And I've seen a lot of like turmoil and just very reactive behaviors as a child. And because I saw those things and I was able to have an awareness of it, it was almost like, let's do the opposite are. So I sent my parents. I love both my parents and they did the best that they could with the knowledge and resources that were available to them at the time. They have grown up since and my relationship with them now is much more genuine and heartfelt and loved. Compared to when I was a kid, it was more tumultuous. It was a little bit more difficult to really grasp the idea, especially my relationship with my father, because he was a very big, tough man and I was more of like a soft, kind of introspective type person. So it was very hard to establish a relationship with him. But because of all the things that I saw, it made me want to. Not imitate, but do it better. How can I have a relationship that's better than the one that my parents have? How can I not make the same mistakes as my grandparents did? And you know, I love my grandparents. My grandfather made my grandmother cry constantly, but she loved that man to death and even after. So there was things I had to pick and choose. And then through personal development as well as books and educating myself and having an awareness, I was like, okay, these things work, these things don't. Let's apply these things correct and continue and really try. And I guess if you really understand something, you're able to then teach it to others.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Well, yes. Right. Was what I said in the intro. We put the do in learn, do teach, and in order to teach it to others, you first have to do it, understand it yourself. There is something very specific of what you said that looking at, and it's almost like an enlightened moment when you were a child of, I don't want to do that. I don't want to do it this way. So I'm going to go and do it the exact opposite way. But just doing it the exact opposite way is one thing how can I do it better? So what have. I would love to go back and to little, little nights past and just have a conversation with him. And I'd love to do it. Do that now. What did. What would you. Which resource or which learning or which insight would you bring to little Nate today?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Who? Let's see. An insight that I would bring to Little Nate is and I've had this conversation through a NLP exercise where you go back in time and you have conversations. Yeah. And you go back and you correct or fix the, the inner child. And I've had that moment with my inner child where the earliest memory I have is me sitting in front of the TV. My mom is behind me and I believe she was talking to my grandfather or maybe it was her sister, but this early memory was just me hearing my mom tell me that the doctors think I'm sick, that the doctors don't think that I'm going to grow, that I'm very small, that I'm not eating, that there's all these things wrong with me. And I think that implanted something where it became a core belief that there is something wrong with me and as a young child to then adopt that thinking. It then overtook most of my actions and all of my behaviors because any time I did something and I didn't get the reaction that I wanted, the first thought in my head was, There is something wrong with me and this is proof. So something I would tell my younger self would be that there's absolutely nothing wrong with you. You are perfect exactly the way that you are. You will continue to grow and you will continue to mature. And even though you will go through hard times where you stand today as I am right now, it'll all be worth it.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So there's a compassion and there's an insight. And I hear that often, especially when I work with parents and children. You know, when I hear parents go, what's wrong with you? What's what's right with you. So what's right with Nate?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Oh, so many things. He has a fantastic smile. He has a very energetic personality. He could hold the conversation above his his education level or wherever he was. You know, I love talking with older kids and adults because I felt like I could actually have conversations with them compared to kids, like they were just not on the same level as me. And I know that's a little arrogant, but it was true because I didn't belong with my peers. They wanted to bump me up a couple of grades, but I would have been the smallest in the class and they feared for my physical well-being. So they just kept me in the grade whenever I was in.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So your mind was big, but your body was small. Tiny, tiny. And then how did you compensate that at any point?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Oh, yeah, all day. So like all my personality traits are because I never I felt inferior. I felt very inferior in my whole life because I was the tiniest kid in the class. I was the shortest. I was either the fattest or the I wasn't the best looking kid. So I'm like, all right, that's not going to work for me. So I really have to develop something that is going to benefit me, and that was communication. Now in my adult life, I know that communication is the most vital tool in your arsenal to shape the world around you, all your relationships, everything that you do, everything that you have and the world around you. The way you see it starts with a conversation, whether it be with yourself or mostly actually with the conversations you have with yourself. What you tell yourself in private or when no one else is hearing or or watching you. Those things really do create the reality around you and to. To come from a place of. What's wrong with you instead of like what's right with you? Is such a difference in outlook of how the world around you is? And I'm glad you brought that up, because that tiny little shift in perspective changes an entire world.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yes. Yeah. And. And. And it's right there. If we have the lenses to look at the other side like you did and you seem to have those lenses even when you were little. I don't want to go in that direction. I want to go in the other direction. Right. I don't want to I don't want to focus on and I don't know if you were you were certainly not cognitively aware of it or cognizant of it. But you knew that going in that same direction would not be what was modeled to you as a young child, would not have been a good way for you to go. Absolutely. The gift. I love what you said earlier, that you have the gift of gab. Now, does anyone else in your family have the gift of gab?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Yeah. I talk a lot like my mom. And interesting enough, like, I never really had a friendship with my dad. He was very stern with me, and now he's a little bit loose and he plays around with me sometimes. But as a kid, it was always like I got the strict parents and whenever I saw him interact with whether it would be like a bank teller or a friend that he had, everybody loved my dad. He was the silly person. He was the one that got into people's faces and talked to them. And he he as at a young age, he actually had me go up to girls, of course, because he was a single person. And he had me he used me as a tool to. To chase tail. He would have me at 3 to 3 years old. Say, hello, my name is. My name is Nate. What's your name? How can I can I call you like. And I would say these things not knowing what they meant. But he taught me to never fear to to never fear, to talk to anybody. Be fearless when it comes to approaching them, shake their hand, make eye contact. And that's something that I genuinely appreciate my dad for having, because his ability to approach literally anybody and just have conversations with them is unmatched. He just had either a lack of awareness or it's just such bold confidence. And I'd like to believe it's the bold confidence. But my dad's ability to just. He came to Texas and he just like we'd we'd go out, we'd lose him. Next thing you know, he's like talking to some random stranger. And I just I feel like even though my dad never showed me that, like, as like, hey, this is how you do it. Watching him and modeling him, I definitely was able to take those parts and be like it was almost a form of jealousy. Like, I wish my dad was like that with me, but then now I have the ability to do that same thing with other people. And my mom is also a very smart, very intellectual, very well-spoken person. She's also her humor is very like I've I've fallen and injured myself very terribly. And it almost made her piss herself because she was laughing so hard. So that was my mom.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
There's actually there's actually a German word for that. And it's called schadenfreude. Schadenfreude. It is. When you take pleasure in someone else's pain.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Oh yeah. That's that's her. I one of my favorite stories was since I was a fat kid, I didn't fit in kid costumes. I had to wear adult sized costumes because that's how large I was. And I was a whoopee cushion for Halloween one year. And I was this giant, giant pink whoopee cushion. Right. And I was so excited to go trick or treating that I ran down this hill that my where my aunt lived. And I like I swear to God, I was I was this wide and my head was right in the middle of the costume. And as I was running down, I fell flat and slid down the hill. I fell so hard. Other parents ran to me to like, help me. My mother was too busy laughing in the middle of the street.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I am. I'm cracking up over here because I can only imagine I have this whole movie in my head now because I am like your mother. I take. I am. I'm. I'm prone to schadenfreude. And so I have one more question around this story. Sure. Did it make sounds?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Oh, no. So I bought a whoopee cushion and had it underneath the costume. So that way, any time, any time somebody would hug me or touch me, I would it would let out the fart noise. And then I fell so hard that I ripped it.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Oh, rent the whoopee cushion.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
So. So, like, the benefit of having a mother like this is that you develop the thickest of skin. So, like, when people come at me and say things or judge me or criticize me, it's I almost laugh because I'm like, there's nothing you could say to me that my mother hasn't said or worse. And her favorite line is, You're going to therapy anyway. I'm just giving you something to talk about.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Is that the reason? I mean, because it's a big stretch, right? You're you're you do corporate trainings. You go and and and help other individuals to be better in their business in a corporate setting. And then on the flip side, you're a podcaster, right? Carbon datum is your is your podcast. And I want to hear about. For everyone else that's watching, they're probably leaning in and going, Now I want to know what carbonara means because we all know what carpe diem means, right? Like seize the day. Right. And then on top of that, you're also a comedian.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Yes.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And you just had was it a one year anniversary?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Yeah. Just celebrated my one year anniversary in comedy.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
That's amazing. Congratulations. So, carbon datum. What is it?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
So carbon atom or as your husband properly pronounces it, it's carbon. Nachum But because my name is Nate, I was like, Oh, this is perfect for me. It means CS The butt cheeks. So like carpe diem, seize the day, carpe a knockdown and seize the night and then carpet native is seize the cheeks. And I genuinely believe that if one were to focus their energy the same way they focus their energy when they're chasing tail. If they were to apply that same energy in their business, in their projects, in life in general, they would get so much more done. So my whole thing is I am I know my purpose is to uplift, inspire and educate. And I love doing that with my the knowledge that I have my creativity as well as my humor. Because, yes, all these personal development books are wonderful. All these things are are designed to make you feel better. But it almost seems like it's so serious. You have to take everything so serious. And I'm like, I don't think you have to. I think you can laugh up the mountain. Like, if you're struggling, there's no reason for you not to smile while struggling. It makes it makes the trip and the journey feel so much better. So with the podcast itself, I love interviewing very interesting people. I get to pick their brains, such like you. You're with your episode coming out tomorrow. My editor said that it was one of the best episodes that I've ever recorded. He loves that episode and the when I do solo episodes, I'm basically just breaking down thoughts and ideas that I've learned through personal development, through books that I'm currently reading and just disseminating information that I believe is useful for others to better apply it in my life and to better understand it, I do my best to teach it through the medium of a podcast.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And I love what you said and I hope that everyone took note of that. And that is not take yourself too serious and that you can even through something like seize the the cheeks, seize the butt cheeks, that what did you say? If you put as much energy in and chasing tails, you can also apply the same concept. That's a success pattern.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
It is a success pattern and something that I've that a story that I tell is just like, imagine a scenario where you are just so busy and it's probably not even hard to imagine because you probably are so busy and you're so you've got so many projects going on. You have all these things that people invite you out and you're like, I can't go out. You know how busy I am. And then one day by chance, you meet somebody that hits all of your markers and they're interested in you, and then they ask you, Are you free tonight? And all of a sudden you move mountains in order to see them. When you are in love, when you are chasing tail, tail, when you are in that mode of seeking romantic companionship, whether it be platonic, sexual, it doesn't matter whatever label you put on it when that same energy to then move your tremendously busy schedule that you wouldn't move or budge for anyone else. You then do this for the person that you are interested in. If you take that same energy and all it is is energy and apply it to your business, your projects, the the little mundane things that you do, it just seems like life is just a little bit fun, a little bit more fun, and you can achieve so much more because you're doing it from a place of love, from a place of like this high, pure energy.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
It seems purposeful, right? There's a there's a specific purpose there. And plugging into that purpose and knowing where does that lie? Right. And I love that you bring that comparison of those two almost polar opposites. Well, they are polar opposites, I mean, in.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
A way, because, like, I feel like I spent a lot of time chasing tail and it was like a waste of time because it had no purpose. I was basically just looking for, like, hook ups. I was big into the hookup culture. I was a musician, I was a rock star. So like I was obviously doing these things. And then it came to a point where I was like, Why am I doing all these behaviors? And I realized that these behaviors that I was exhibiting were because I wanted to get in good with my dad, because him and I never connected on anything. So like the one thing that we could connect on is me involving myself in hookup culture, because then he could be like, That's my son. And that's that, the weirdness of my dad. I love my dad, but he's he's very machismo. And then it came to a realization after years of doing this, it just led to insecurities, it led to depressions. It led to these feelings of of like ego. So I realized that if I were to take that same energy and hone it into something more productive and more constructive. The things around me that I could build. It's just unimaginable. And I am now a domesticated dog. I am I you know, I was you.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Really.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Though I felt like I was I felt like I was a stray animal picking through garbage and my wife, like, fed me so that she could pet me and then took me inside and put a caller on and then bathed me. And now I'm an indoor dog. Like the person I was three years ago is so different than the person I am now. And because I have someone to focus my attention on because I'm not chasing tail, I still have all this energy and all this momentum. What can I do to better serve others? What can I do to better serve myself? So first I had to take care of myself, my surroundings, everything that I was working on. I was working from a place of a negative, right? I had I was sleeping at my car at one point. I had my account in the negative. I couldn't even afford food. Like my account was so in the red that I couldn't even overcharge it to buy food. Like that's how terrible my life had gotten to a point. And because I had somebody that adored me and treated me so amazingly and kept me centered and grounded, I was able to build everything that we have around us now. And I'm so grateful and fortunate for all the opportunities that I've been given and all the things that I have now. But I really have to give credit to my wife, who helped me stay grounded, build a solid foundation that wasn't built in, built on ego, or it was built in in the space of just like I'm just going to tear it down anyway. Like, I'm now building a castle so I can build a kingdom, so I can build a legacy. Compared to before I was building sand castles. And yeah, they may have been impressive, but they were kicked over as soon as the tide came in.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
What would you say? This is also fascinating. You have for the the young years that you're in sound. I sound horribly old when I say that. What would you say is like the overarching pattern or trend of all of the things that you do, the gift of gab, the podcast, the training, the corporate trainings, the comedian, the you said you're being you were a rock star, all of those things. What would you say is like a.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
I'm sure it just comes from a place of wanting to be the center of attention. I was an only child, so my need for external validation is tremendously high and I use that to my advantage. So when I do something like corporate training or when I do something like a comedy or when I do something like music, it all comes from the same place. I want to inspire, uplift or educate in some way or capacity. So if I don't do all three, I at least do one write. All the lyrics that I wrote were in a way trying to encourage and push up others or to push away from all the negatives. Any comedy that I do, I'm seeking external validation, but I'm doing it for the point of making somebody laugh. I'm trying to rile somebody up. I'm trying to, like, just get somebody to to giggle and to smile and to, like, think silly thoughts. I'm not trying to start any controversies or come from a place of hate. I just want to make others smile. And because that makes me smile because I can make myself giggle. I make myself laugh all the time. But to make others laugh and to make others smile it makes me feel so good. And I do that in my trainings. I do that in my comedy. I do that in so many and so many different ways. Do I always hit the mark? No. Right. I'm not perfect. Perfect is impossible. But I bring my best and I do my best every time. And that's as much as I can give and that's as much as I'm willing to give every single time.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So so because I am so removed and I'm listening to you, there is a pattern within that pattern. And that is, again, you took something that could be viewed as egocentric. You're doing it for your own satisfaction, but you've turned it around so you you're aware that that's what's driving you and you turn it around and you made it where it where other people are gaining, where you're inspiring them, but you're using that energy that's driving you to to move that machine forward, to inspire others.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Absolutely. And at the core of it, I believe that I'm truly selfish where everything that I'm doing, even the podcast itself, it's my journey of self mastery. It's my journey of self-discovery. And in education, I'm doing it selfishly to better myself if I happen to help someone else along the way, which is totally my intention. It's more of like a sprinkle on the sun. Then than it is like the main course. I love the fact that people listen to my podcast and tell me that they resonate with the message. I love the fact that people tell me that my trainings are fantastic or that they loved my music or I loved. I love hearing all of it. At the end of the day, I always think like, okay, that's great. I did it for me. I did it because I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it and also to prove to the naysayers that I could. I just do it in a way that I can also. It overflows and spills over to others in a way that isn't destructive. Because the last thing I would want to do is leave a conversation or leave an interaction where I left someone feeling worse off than before they met me.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I see you. I hear you. I feel you because I know you. And even if I would have not known you, like Brian just said, I love his authenticity and I agree with him. Right. That what is there not to love about Nate? And the first time I met you, I had such a genuine and and and and I don't know if it was motherly. It was just love. Right? And it's easy to give that to you. You make it very easy.

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
Thank you.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
How do people follow you? How do they hear and see more of you what you're doing, your podcast, your comedy stuff and everything else?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
So I am on all platforms at Carpenter Datum 114. It's CERP and ATM 114, and you can even find that as a website, not carbon datum 114 where we have links to resources. We have all the podcast episodes live. You can find me on basically everywhere that you can stream a podcast, just type in carbon datum. I'm pretty much the first thing that comes up if I'm not if it's not a playlist, the first podcast that comes up and that's pretty much where you can find me. Now, the projects that I'm working on is I'm trying to develop a OR I'm currently in the process of developing a coaching program as well as just doing my best to get on more podcasts and talk to more interesting people. So I am truly honored to have been a guest on The Success Pattern Show and to have another conversation with you is a treat in in of itself.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I, i, i thank you for that and I can only give it back. It's always a beautiful back and forth and I learn every time I talk to you, I learn. And I appreciate how you view life and how you have been working on your on your inner work. And it truly shows how it shows up in the outer, as I shared with everyone that's watching. And thank you for your comments. Thank you for your interactions. I said that I have a gift for you, so go ahead and get your gift bit by t that wl y slash center of NLP bit.ly slash center of NLP is your gift. It is the success patterns laws that you can get right now, and that is my gift to you. That was also the gift that I gave to Nate's folks that when we had our podcast or the podcast coming out tomorrow because we recorded it. So go ahead and get your gift. Now get with Nate. Nate said one more time, where can people find you?

Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso:
You can find me at Carpe Datum 114 across all socials. And we also do have a Facebook group called at Facebook.com forwards slash groups, forwards slash carbon atom without the 114. But on all socials it's carbon atom 114. And I thank everyone who follows me on this journey. And I, I genuinely hope that the things that I do and say, put a little pep in your step and make your day just a little better.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Put a little pep in your step. Nate. Thanks for being here, guys. Next week, Tuesdays, same time, same place. Tune in again, Nate. Lots of love to you and your wife. Thanks for being here. This was a success pattern show. Ciao, everyone. Thank you for tuning in to the Success Pattern Show at WW. The Success Pattern Show. My name is Brigitta. Who?

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Nate De La Hoya-Reynoso

I Believe that my purpose is to use my knowledge creativity and humor to uplift inspire and educate others. In my journey of self mastery I hope to help others along the way.

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