Special Guest Expert - Maija-Liisa Adams

Special Guest Expert - Maija-Liisa Adams: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Maija-Liisa Adams: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back they're dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question, and the answers are right here. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle and this is The Success Patterns Show. That is right. Welcome, everyone, to The Success Patterns Show. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle as I just introduced myself to you, we are here as we put the do in learn do teach. I'm the founder of The Success Patterns Movement and the CEO of the Center of NLP and Success Patterns Show. Let me just decipher it for you, because that's exactly what we do. We do a lot of deciphering, we do a lot of encode decoding and encoding and really kind of peeling back the layers of how are people being successful. And you know what? Success isn't one thing. Like if you look in the dictionary doesn't say, oh, everyone is successful when this happens, no success changes with each success seeker, with each person that is either successful or looking to be successful. It might involve money, it might not involve money. It might be in your business, it might be in your personal life, it might be in both. So it is not one clear, perfect definition of what success is. And that's why we have these incredible guest experts that are here being interviewed on the Success Pattern Show, because we peel back those layers of how are they successful and what brought them there and how are they seeking to continue to grow and to continue to seek success, whatever that means for them. A lot of our leaders that are here in the success pattern show as guest, as a special guest experts are continuous learners. And there's a pattern right there that I'm surrounding myself with guest experts that are the servant leaders that are looking to continuous growth, that are not coming from a mindset of, Oh, I already know that, because when you say that, all of the learning already ceases.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So that's the success part. The patterns part is an example. A pattern is an example for others to follow. And that's why we're here. We're not here to be the good great talking heads and pat ourselves on the shoulder of how great we are. We're here for you because when you can decode someone's pattern of getting where you want to go, then you can actually encode it for your own self. And that's that's what modeling is. You look how people are behaving. What do they value, how which action steps are they taking? So you can then mirror it and apply it in your own life as as humans were hardwired for hands on application. And we are very hands on rich here in the success pattern show. So today I have an incredible guest expert and we're going to give you tips on how to model that success of where she is leading us today, because she has a clear message and not just she has a clear message. Actually, you have a clear message. And if you're not clear about your message yet, she will help you to really get your message clear, because we all have a message that is worth hearing. We all have a message that needs to be heard. And she helps you to get that message out. She's been a TEDx speaker coach for the last six years. She works at a university. And we're going to hear her story and we're going to going to ask her a little bit about the background. But she has she has been leading and supporting other TEDx speakers and really getting their message out. And there are people that have been denied of speaking on a or not even they have applied. Maybe it's not even denying, maybe they just didn't get through because there are so many applications that you send in when you're looking to speak at a TED stage, she will help you to clarify that message. And because of her, I am also speaking on a TED stage, so we're going to hear more about that. So she's here to up level the visibility as a go to expert, because when you're in a TEDx stage, you are the go to expert and whatever you're speaking about, she helped with she helps with applications.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
She helps with the flow of what to say and when to say it and what not to say. And, you know, we as success as part of the success laws, we also look at feedback, not failure, but feedback. And there's great feedback in when you're not not being taken as a TEDx speaker or you're being denied. So she helps you what to say. How to say it. And she's got 1.78 million views from a TEDx talk that she helped. So please help me welcome. And if you are in a car, don't stand up for for everyone else. Stand up on your feet and help me welcome Miss Maya. Lisa Adams. Maya, Lisa, so good to have you.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
So good to be with you, Brigitta. Thank you so much.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So, you know, you come highly recommended, not just by me, but by many. And I have gone through your program and students have gone through your program. How did you get to be a TEDx coach?

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Well, the reason partly that you're going to be on the stage in your homeland is because a few years ago, I think it's now been more than six years ago, I was asked to teach a class public speaking at the university where I live in Rexburg, Idaho, Brigham Young University, Idaho. And so I helped them with that. I said, Sure, I'll teach a public speaking class. And then they said, How about this other class where they do professional presentations, everything about PowerPoint. But one of the assignments is to give a TEDx style talk. Of course, they can't call them TED talks because Ted is very strict on branding, as everyone should be very strict on their branding. But I still took students and I still take them to the to that process of learning how to find that one idea that's worth spreading on the stage. So I've done that with hundreds of students now. And as I got started, though, in my hometown, a student actually started a TEDx Rexburg event and I found out that next door 30 miles away, there was another event, Ted's Idaho Falls, and I attended them. And then when they found out it was a public speaking coach, they said, Would you coach our speakers? Because some of them could have used some help because they have a great idea. How often do you have a great idea? But there's so much noise in what you're saying. Nobody can hear your message. So I feel like that's my job, that I have really come to value so much as to take out the noise. People say, How am I going to fill up 20 minutes? The first thing is you don't get 20 minutes and some of the best talks are 5 minutes and under. Because what we're doing and it takes longer to create a talk like that is we're taking out what doesn't belong. So your message or one idea shines.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I think it was Ben Franklin and I'm not 100% certain, but I'm just going to give him credit for right now for saying if I would have had more time, I would have written the shorter memo.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Yes.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And, you know, talking long. And I can only speak out of my own experience and maybe you can identify with that. Talking long is easy, being brief and getting your point through. That's hard, Melissa.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
It is. And that's what I spend the time doing is if you are too verbose in your application or if you wrote several sentences in your application and they said, say it in 15 words, they're looking for reasons not to put you on the stage. And the reason is because so many people want to be there. You've got to think of it as if you're finding a job. And so how do you and there's so many other people who have great ideas, maybe even in your own field, how do you raise a how do you come above the others so that they say, I want to I want to hear.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Brigida Yeah. And that, you know, that being different, that it's almost like questioning the status quo. I don't know how many how many TEDx stages are there out there. Do you know?

Maija-Liisa Adams:
When I started, there were 300 licenses given around the world. Today there are over 4500 licenses. What? Yeah.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Did that kind of mushroom. I don't know if mushroom is a good choice of words, but I'll use it anyway. Through the pandemic.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
You know, through the pandemic, some of the stages closed down. So it came down a little bit. But licenses are given. Not all of them end up happening because of things like the pandemic. But if you go just to TED.com and anyone can do this and say, attend a TEDx event, you will see somewhere between six and 12 events happening today. So I'd say on the average there are eight or nine events happening somewhere around the world every day, 365 days of the year.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Wow. So there's a lot of great content out there. I just recently, I think it was yesterday that I was talking to someone. Oh, it was my hairdresser. I got my haircut yesterday and was my hairdresser. And we were talking about Ted and Ted stages and he said, there's this TED talk about neuro neuroscience and analogy with the tree. And I immediately looked it up. I didn't know about it, but there's so much great value out there. And because we went, as you said, we went from 300 licenses to 4000, it is also getting, I would say, noisier with all of those experts out there. How do you cut through that noise?

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Well, you have to really yourself let me ask you questions and be honest about those answers and say all of this. If you could only say one thing, what is it? And it's almost like if you're the end of your life and you want to make sure you're passing this on to your kids and their posterity and so forth of all of this, what's the most important? So for you, it's listening and it's lots of people talk about listening. Someone who I followed starting 30 years ago who's now passed away, Stephen Covey talked a lot about listening and I have a discussion about that. So how do you become another expert about listening that's different or that how listening has changed because of the pandemic? You always have to say not just something you're passionate about, but why you're the one to share it and why it needs to be heard today.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, I think that is that is key right there because there are many if you if I Google and I did know if I look for TED talks on listening there's plenty out there right and going through the application process and I went through many applications, not just in Germany, I applied in Stuttgart, Berlin, Frankfurt. That's where I'm going now. Munich, several here in the States, I think it was Chattanooga, Atlanta and some others. Birmingham. Yeah, the application process is that. It's it's. It's the. It's the. Going through and cutting out the noise and standing out where they go. Oh. We want to learn more about that. We want to hear more about that.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Well, you just gave the answer that many need to realize. Don't get on the stage and tell me something I can Google. Save the things that are strictly the thing that only Brigida can come and share from Regina's perspective, because I haven't ever thought about it the way she has. And you want them saying, Wow, I've never thought about it that way. You want them to become better listeners and you want it to be a simple little thing. You don't want to overwhelm. Like you've got to stand on your head and rub your tummy at the same time. You just want something simple that will take them from not listening as closely to their spouse or child or client. That where you made a difference. That one little thing helped them move forward and transform. And it's not meant to be inspirational or motivational. You don't want to say, Oh, that was so great, I'm going to be a better listener, and then they don't do anything. So number one, maybe someone hasn't said how to or why it's so important, but then you want it to be actionable. It's an idea we're spreading.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, there's so on a TED stage, you're not allowed to sell.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
No.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
You're not selling. But in the point that you just made is you want to have a clear call to action, not in sale, but to give to give the audience or the listener to hear are your next steps. Apply this so it'll actually make a difference in your life.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Now, let me give you an example. One of the processes I use is called the Five Whys. And so an example of that might be. People aren't writing in their journals. Well, and even though it's important, why aren't they? Because they think it takes so much time or it's too hard to do and there's no time to find. I mean, I think everybody could relate that we should probably write down some things, but we think, Oh, I don't have time to do it. But if you go down to that and know that they would have better records, life of their days could be better because they reflect on it. But you're telling them if you just write one sentence a day, that's doable. Now, it may not be this genius idea, but sometimes the most helpful ideas are the simplest. I mean, we even find that in the parables and stories in the Bible, some people would put it aside because it's it's too easy to do. But your idea just needs to be clear. Let me give you an example on the stage. About a dozen years ago, Joe Smith spoke and he spoke in four and a half minutes. And when he got up, he gave a big number of how much stuff we could save, trees and so forth. And then he said, if we would just use one paper towel and shake our hands before we use the paper towel and the public restroom. So he divides it. You and I were talking about getting the ideas and audience involved. He said, okay, this side of the room is shake. This side of the room is full. He had to a soapy water and a clear water. You had about six different types of paper towels from around different restrooms in the building and other buildings close by. And so he would put his hands in and then he would say, shake, and then 12 times and he'd do something fun. Like, why 12? Well, there's 12 months, 12 zodiacs, 12 apostles, whatever. So it was memorable. I mean, I've never forgotten this talk, right? Yeah. And then he said, your job is to say fold so full. And he says, okay, here's this paper towel a little bit longer, a little bit shorter. It's from this restroom. That restroom now fold it in half. So shake 12 times, fold it in half. And every time your hands are going to come dry with only one paper towel. Now, whether you're into it because of saving the economy or not, that is engaging. It's simple. And I can't walk into a public restroom without using one paper towel to say.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
You will always remember that talk.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
And you know it's worth spreading when you're talking to another coach in Australia about this talk. And she said, I was just in the airport and this woman shook her hands 12 times, folded it and I said, Joe Smith. And she said, You got it.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
12 years. That's the kind of legacy. Right. Right. And and it's I want to reiterate, it's it's engaging. It's simple. It's memorable.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
One of the most memorable is Bill Gates, who I used to watch him present. I used to be in software as a regional sales manager in the Silicon Valley when I started out and I would attend the big computer shows and he would come in, I'll like he hadn't even slept or combed his hair or anything. Brilliant man, but not an engaging speaker. But on the TED stage, when he was talking about his new passion, which is about vaccinations and this one was about malaria and helping people, he has all of these high level people who have paid big money to sit on the front row of the once a year TED event. That's four days long, three sessions a day, eight speakers in each one. And this and he's talking about we spend more money on male pattern baldness than we do on solving the malaria problem. And he takes and he says, why should they in Africa be the only ones to suffer from this? And he opens up a container to release mosquitoes into the room and they are jumping off the rows like it is so memorable. It's this wow moment that people remember from the TED stage is when he unleashed mosquitoes. Plus he has this big image up on the screen of a mosquito stinger on a finger full of blood. So, I mean, it's coming in like he's getting this point across. That's a wow moment. Now, truth be told is he didn't really release mosquitoes. And it was it was one of those plastic containers where you put CDs, a whole spindle that was just empty. That's all it was. But it got the point across. So what is your wow moment? Nancy Duarte is someone who did a TED talk on the secret structure of a talk. And in there she said, You've got to have something they'll always remember. She calls it a star moment. Same thing, the wow moment. So what is that memorable? It's going to be a big thing. It's just something that's there. And they go, Oh, Joe Smith, Bill Gates, mosquitoes.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. Yeah. And I'm so thrilled that you say that again, because it gets me personally thinking again, how can I make that wow moment even greater, right? Because I'm not just going to go on that stage. And I think everyone that's applying for speaking on the TED stage, it is not a simple task. It is a very lengthy and a very, you know, to speak it, in Brené Brown's words, a very vulnerable task as well.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Yeah.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
So you out? Yeah. And you asked you answered your own question there. I wonder what I could do. That's exactly what a person needs to do is say, Now I wonder what I should take out. I wonder what I should keep in. I wonder what I could do to make this more impactful. I wonder what I could do to make this more engaging. Ask yourself those questions and of course, test it with people too. So at this stage, if you're out, then giving it to different people, not worrying about they're not going to watch my TEDx talk, then I'm not going to get as much views. You are doing it because you want the people who do watch it, then later to say, Oh, you've got to listen to Birgitta.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. The testing is a big, big piece. And you know, in NLP, in the training that I do with people in large organizations or with entrepreneurs, there is a there's a strategy called tote tote test operate test exit. So I'm in that test, operate test the TOT test operate test phase right now where I'm getting feedback as I'm operating and then I'm testing again. So at the end, the result is going to be the exit and that's what you guys are going to see. Lastly on on stage and Frankfurt excited about that. I don't know exactly what that's going to look like yet, and I'm excited about that result.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
But we're going to talk again to make sure that we're taking some more noise out and making it more engaging. Right.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
For sure. For sure that taking the noise out and being very specific and not diluting. Your talk by just filling the ether with noise, right? By truly being I think intentional is is the is the right term here being intentional with your message.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Because here's the thing is you should be able to say your idea in one sentence. That's why a lot of TEDx stages ask you what's your idea in ten words, 15 words, one sentence, 1 to 2 sentences. They all ask a little bit differently. But that one idea can be a whole book like The Art of War is all written around one idea, a few pages in. And what it is, is all of warfare is deception. And Brené Brown is there's power and vulnerability. Simon Sinek is people don't care what don't buy what you do or how you do it. They buy why you do it. And so he can talk about it for 15 minutes or less. He can write a book about it. He can give. A keynote speech. That's 45 speech. That's 45 minutes or 60 minutes. Do a three day seminar on it and then branch off. But it all comes down to start with Y, which is the shorter version of people don't buy what you do or how you do it. They buy why you do it.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. I don't know. The two stars. Well, in my in my view, they're stars. Right. Brené Brown has a very similar back story to you, doesn't she?

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Yeah, in some ways she is a research professor and she did research on guilt and shame for ten years. And then in Houston, she was asked to come to her local TEDx event and share with them what had she learned from that? And she is a great not only she is a great scientist, but she is a great storyteller. So she could marry those two together. She didn't even know when she got on the stage she was being recorded because it was newer in the TED days and part of Britney and Simon, Cynics fame, especially, Simon says, is, look, it was the timing. And like we said, now it's so crowded. So they were new, it was novel. And then when there was a great idea, like, like either of theirs. But she's if you listen at the beginning of her TED talk, they were both invited to speak on the TED stage then, which happens once a year in April. She said, I wasn't prepared to find that in two years 4 million people had watched my talk. But she just so honestly gave what she had learned from studying our shame and guilt. And that is the vulnerable. There's power and vulnerability. And not only that, she was vulnerable on the stage. She was horrified to find out I was now going to go on the Internet, she said. It got to the point where I would walk into stores and go, Mommy, there's that vulnerability. And she wasn't prepared for it. But it's done her well. But she just leaned into it like We need to be vulnerable.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, yeah. Her and she had Simon Sinek on her podcast, I think it was during the pandemic. I don't know if you listen to that podcast. It is.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Let's go listen to that. It is.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I've listened to it so far four times and every time the first time I didn't take notes, the second time, third time within four, fourth time I took notes and I will listen to it again. It's so rich. And you know what the most beautiful thing was that Simon said it was during the pandemic that they recorded it and Simon was so vulnerable to say, I kind of lost during the lockdown the connection to my why, and it gives me the goose bumps because it makes him.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
So when you said that.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
It makes me. Yeah. And it proves the point of what they're both speaking about. Right. So I'm going to put it out there. They're both going to be on the success pattern show. And I guess I have I have a whole list of people that are going to be on the Success Pattern Show, and Brené Brown and Simon Sinek are two of them for sure.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Let's talk the Seven Degrees of Separation of Kevin Bacon. So who's listening out here that know somebody that knows? I do know someone who knows Renee Brown and I, but they don't like to just be reached out that quickly. But but yes, it'll happen. So put it out there and somebody in your audience will help you with this.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, I totally agree. There is a difference between a TEDx stage because you just spoke about it. You know, Brené Brown first was on a TEDx stage and then she was invited on the TEDx stage. What's the difference?

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Ted started back in 1984, if you can imagine, in the Silicon Valley. And it stands for technology, entertainment and design. Ted. And the thing about California, that's what they're known for. Right. And so they would get together. The experts in technology, entertainment design would get together for an annual conference. And they said, we don't want you to talk about everything. Just tell us what's new this year. That's why it went from 45 minute keynote to 18 minutes or less. Mm hmm. And that continues to this day. The only time it didn't happen was the year of the pandemic. Then it was virtual the next last year, and then it was live this year. And then people who had attended would say, I want to do a TEDx event in my region. And that's when they started saying, okay, we'll give licenses. It'll be very highly, you know, there's a whole set of rules. You can go in and see what those rules are on TED.com. And they gave all those licenses and there were 300 and then 600 and then 1000. And then we're up to the 4000 now. And a TED, the x stands for independently organized. And we really should say I am a TEDx Rexburg speaker or I'm a TEDx Frankfort speaker because the license is given for that. And so when people people will mix them up all the time and say, Ted and Ted, but there is a difference. The main stage, the nonprofit, the organizing group is Ted. And they're the ones who grant licenses to universities or cities and even businesses to hold their own regional event.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So people, speakers that are looking to speak ultimately on a TEDx stage, not a TEDx stage, are being vetted through the TEDx stages.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
I would assume you can apply right on TED.com to be a TEDx speaker. It just doesn't really happen that way. I got a chance to listen to the ten finalists where Ted was doing a search for ideas in Africa. So they right now they're doing Southeast Asia. So if there's anybody listening and you're and you live in Southeast Asia or you're descended from Southeast Asia, you have till about a month before you would need to submit a video pitching your idea. And then they go through all of those and they will choose someone. They choose down to ten and then other people will listen to them and vote on them. So I got to be a part of that with Africa. Just recently, I haven't heard the results yet. So they're always, always looking. And I don't remember one question what was it? But I thought that was important to share.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, the question was.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
I can't remember the question. There's so many. There's so many stages to to apply. Oh, yeah. Whether you apply to TED.com, if you want to get. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So there's TED women that's coming up. And that's so Ted is held in April. Ted Women is held usually the first part of December or somewhere around there. That's usually in Palm Springs. And then you can apply to get a TED Women license. So let's say that Ted Rexburg decides to have not only a standard event, but they want to do a Ted Rexburg women event. Then they also apply for that license and then they can have that at the end of the year. So some people, some of those are already closed and some of those are open right now. So you might be that you want to get on a TED women's stage, too. So there are lots of different varieties, but mainly it's Ted and Ted and the way you would get on a TED is then hearing you do really well on Ted and people say, oh my goodness, you've got to listen to Brené Brown or Simon Sinek. In fact, Simon Sinek wasn't even the one originally asked to speak at the TEDx Puget Sound. Someone who has asked that, Oh no, you need to listen to Simon Sinek. And so he came on because someone recommended him there really three ways to get on the TED stage. Some stages are only going to pull out speakers. They're going to get together and say, our community is concerned about these issues. We want to hear about these topics. Who are the experts? Let's go out and find them around the world and invite them in. Others will say, Hey, you've just been at this TEDx event. Who do you know who should speak next year? Nominate them. And so I can say, Regina, I put in and say this. I've heard her speak. This is what she speaks about. Oh, you've got to listen to it. Now, don't turn that into a campaign saying let's have 100 people recommend you because they you know, these are volunteers. They're just looking for the recommendation. And then the other one is you actively know you have a message inside of you. It's time to share it. You may be nervous about it. You may say, I don't know how to apply. Are you apply? I've been rejected and you don't know why. You never heard back so many speakers and they just don't have time to get back to you. Yeah, there are three ways then to get on that stage. Apply yourself, be nominated or be asked.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
It's that simple. And once, once you have applied to a TEDx stage and you have not been called back or denied or whatever language we're going to use for that, can you reapply for the next time round?

Maija-Liisa Adams:
You could. And often, though, it's we shouldn't feel take it as a personal rejection. If we get a no, we can't get a yes until we get a no and we can't get a yes or a no. We get an automatic no if we don't apply.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Right. So amen.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
In fact, I need to stop and tell you I just took on a private client, and we had only had our very first meeting and I happened to on my Facebook page for the speakers. I just came across this one. I felt like I should just normally I don't post it on the Facebook. I'll say, Oh, this speaker, that speaker, I'll send it.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Oh yeah, I saw that one. Yeah.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Guess what? He got an audition yesterday. He texted me and said, I'm auditioning for that ten x one. So I didn't even know he applied. He just he just saw it and did it. And God got the audition. His audition is this Friday. And I think back to someone in a in an earlier group than you and she just went gung ho. If you're coachable and you're an action taker, you're going to get that. Yes, much faster. And within three weeks, she had landed an audition. And then by five weeks there, they said, yep, you're going to be on her stage. And guess what? She has a new job because of that talk she gave in March.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Wow. Yeah. Yeah, man, we could talk about Ted X and and all of the perks and all of the fails and things to not do all day long. I mean, it's easy to speak with my Lisa and my Lisa. I think you have brought a gift for people to for you to share with everyone.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
Yeah, well, you don't know me very well yet, and maybe you don't know if you'd want to work with me. But you might want to know that I've put together some things. Something called the seven TED application fails. Things that you can just look at yourself and say, Oh, yeah, I shouldn't do this, I shouldn't do this, I shouldn't do this. And it's really about getting your message out there. These are seven things that create noise in your application. So these are seven TED Ex fails, so I would love to give that to you. Now when you do that for that, if you scroll down before you're filling it out, there is a link to my calendar and that would be reserved for someone who said, I really do have a message, I'm scared, I'm nervous, I don't know how to get the noise out. I don't know how to apply. Let's have a conversation and we'll talk about your path to the TED stage, just like Brigida and I did.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
I'm looking for you to speak now.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And you know what? Don't. And this is for all the listeners out there. Just because you have been invited to speak another stages does not necessarily make you a good TEDx speaker. I'm just going to put that out there because I, I am and this is not me patting myself on the shoulder, but from feedback from other people. I'm a great trainer, I'm a great speaker, but I needed that step by step from my ELISA to get out of my head and and really narrow down very specifically on what it is that I'm going to talk about for 16 minutes. It's going to be even less than 16 minutes.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
And you're an action tape taker and you're very coachable. And that's why you were so successful. You were also successful quite quickly as well, even though there's like six or seven stages that you're planning to just apply. But before you apply, look at those application fails. And if you want to take another step, then get a coach and some of that who can help you get the noise out there so that you can stand about it. So think about it as applying for a job. I have a tech background. I used to live in the Silicon Valley, was unaware that Ted Ted events were happening back then early in my career. And if i'm going to now look for a job in i.t and i am applying to apple, microsoft and the startup, they are very different companies with very different ys, very different missions. And so just like they're interviewing you, you need to be entering interviewing them. Am I the right fit? Are they the right fit for me? But think of it, if you're looking for a job, what do you do with people who have the exact same skills as you in the exact same field? Somehow you need to rise to the top. And one of the reasons, one of the ways you do that is you're clear, you're concise, you're compelling, and you challenge the status quo and you solve a problem, an actionable thing someone can take away and do. There are lots of TED types. I mean, there's a big idea, a little idea. There's an issue. You turn into an idea. There's voices from the arts, from the sciences and so forth. So there really is no secret formula to your TED talk and you don't have to do it in a template way. But you ask questions and you say, what is going to best represent my idea? Who is it going to help? How can I help them? How can I make it more impactful? What should I take out? What should I keep in? And that's what a coach can help you with.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Boom. So it's it's https. Colon double slash m l like for my ELISA speaks and misspeaks dot com slash ted x application fails so ML speaks cosmetics application fails and that's also where people can can get in touch with you not just download that but can get in touch with you. I say everyone get with my Elisa. It's highly entertaining and very and you're going to learn a whole lot if you're ready to step outside your comfort zone, because she will she will kindly push you out of that. I speak from experience. My Elisa, thank you for being here. Thank you for taking the time to share your wisdom. And I we will have a another success pattern show with my Elisa after I come back from Frankfurt.

Maija-Liisa Adams:
And I can't wait to. Hopefully they'll livestream it. But if not 4 to 6 weeks after you're in Frankfurt, we get to see this. So I hope everybody listening is ready to share that talk because we want to think who needs to hear this? And the truth be told, all of us could be better listeners.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yep. Those are wise words at the very end. Thank you for being here. Guys, tune in again next week. Next. Same time, same place here on The Success Patterns Show on Tuesday. Thanks. Lisa Ciao, everyone. Thank you for tuning in to The Success Patterns Show at www.TheSuccessPatternsShow.com My name is Brigitta Hoeferle.

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Maija-Liisa Adams

Maija-Liisa N. Adams is the founder & CEO of Maija-Liisa Speaks, an Idaho-based global TEDx Talk coaching firm. Over the last six years, Adams has helped more than 120 clients understand how to land, nail and use their TEDx talk to grow their impact and increase their income. As a global keynote speaker, she has spoken in a Castle, addressed 100s of individuals, including the International Women’s Day Conference and BYU-Idaho, where she serves as an adjunct professor in public speaking and professional presentations. Before starting her business, Adams was a Regional Sales Manager for a $1.4 billion-value global software company. Adams is also an esteemed member of Christopher Kai’s GPS global speaker community, where its members include #1 best-selling international authors, thought leaders, world-renowned athletes, and seasoned executives who reside in 120 cities, 30 countries, and 6 continents.

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