Special Guest Expert - John Terry

Special Guest Expert - John Terry: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - John Terry: this eJwdjstqwzAQRX_FzKIrN64fSV1DKIGGgleFPiArI6SxI6wX0jhOHPLvVbKde-65cwVuDaGhji4OoYEdpCBNIGY4dlJAU5YvdV5VeQp8CmT1FNA_gmKTb6p1kQLj3E7R8KDrt3X-mkIvUYnOMH139lJh1I4z80OA5gqTV_F8JHKhybJ5nleDtYNC5mRYcasz4eUJs1OR3ashy-VyHls_KrXQQe8_lrLdDT7U-q_oQvd1GN-Zoq1GIdlTsJPnuBV2Nsoy8RunUiBJ6v7Jt0MumUo-JwyU7M8OPSXPSWuPJvlB7y-R7a3XjCKsXQW32z8HmWKH:1nonqQ:BiKYvyebd6CRWtwnxxMSDW__0y4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back their dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question. And the answers are right here. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle and this is the Success Pattern Show. And that is right. Welcome and happy Tuesday, everyone, to the success pattern show. My name is Bridget. Hopefully we put the do in learn do teach. If you have if you're not taking anything away from today, take this away. It is learning, doing, teaching. A lot of people go learn, teach, and then they don't and they forget the doing part. We're going to talk a little bit more about that. Like I said, my name is Brigitta Hoeferle the founder of the Success Patterns Movement and the CEO of the Center of NLP. And people ask me, So Bridget, a success patterns. Tell me more about that. The definition of pattern is an example for others to follow. It's that simple. And can we agree that success is an interesting thing? It shapes its meaning within each individual success seeker and it's not limited to business or personal life. It is a very unique concept and we in this success pattern show give you the scaffolding to build your own empire. With the show, we are decoding the patterns that led to success of our guest experts. And do we have a surprise for you today so you can then encode your own success today? Because we're hardwired as humans for hands on application taught by living teachers. And we're simply not theoreticians. They talk a good game. We are grand masters at work here and we're going to give you tips how to we're modeling success for you so you can then go out and implement it in your own life. And the implementation is a big, big part of that. And that's what this show is all about.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Success is already yours. You are here. So give yourself a round of applause for being here and for taking notes, as I have an incredible guest expert with us today. He is bringing value as a leader and he says anyone can be a leader, but a few do what is actually required to master leadership and anyone can live life, but only a few do what is required to live real life. His goal is to spend time together to help people realize the necessity of daily learnings to lead themselves well and make good choices and discover what's holding them back. From becoming a better version of themselves because it only takes to be 1% better tomorrow than you are today or 1% better today than you were yesterday. We're only in competition with one person and that is ourselves. So this gentleman is a two time martial arts Hall of Fame inductee. John Terry helps people discover, develop and deploy their own black belt leader within as they go on a long, lifelong quest to become their best version of themselves. He's a two time best selling author, international speaker, coach and trainer. He's the founder of the Black Belt Leadership, and he also serves as president of Real Life Management. He currently serves as an executive director and Presidents Council advisory member of the Maxwell leadership and is a 2021 recipient of the Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award. If you are not in a car, this would be a really, really good time for you to stand on your feet and help me welcome not just a wonderful guest expert, but a dear friend of mine. I was going to say John Maxwell. It is John Terry.

John Terry:
I'll take that comparison any day. Dr. John has been a mentor of mine for many years and I will take that as a compliment. Thank you.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And you have learned from the best. And I'm so honored that you're here with us. John, thank you for for being here and making the time. And, you know, you know, a thing or two about leadership. And what would you say is the biggest misconception when people say they are leaders, but then you look at them, you're like, hmm, you're really not aligned with the words that you're saying and the actions that you're taking.

John Terry:
You know, Regina, most people, when they think of leadership, they think of a title or they think of a position. And as a result of that, they get the title of shift leader or manager or I'm starting my own business and I'm the boss. The biggest misconception is leadership is something you do. Leadership is not something you do. Leadership is something that you are. It's something that you become as you pursue a lifelong quest of really looking inside yourself to discover, develop, and deploy your passion and your purpose and making that a reason for serving other people at the highest level. That's what it means to be a leader. It's not the title. It's what you do that makes a difference in the lives of people.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. So when you see people and they say, well, you know, I'm in, I have a leadership position or I am in leadership, but then you clearly see that they're not leading, that they're more managing. And I think that's the biggest misconception of of leadership in management. What what would you give them as an advice to go from managing into leading.

John Terry:
Management is really telling people what to do. It's saying here is a task, here's a responsibility, here's a job, goal or objective. Go do it. They give a little bit of instruction on the front end. And then outside of that, it's it's live or die. Success or failure, based upon the results of that individual leadership, on the other hand, is modeling the behaviors, the attitudes and the character values that you want to see lived out. It's coming alongside another individual and helping them see success and having an opportunity to grow and excel. And as you said in your opening, become a better version of themselves. Managers manage processes, leaders lead people. That's a huge distinction between the two.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Oh, that was a good one. I hope that everyone wrote that down because that that nugget all in itself is is worth every conversation to have now, as does leadership only happen in business.

John Terry:
That's a great question. And the answer is no. Every day when you and I wake up, we are leading ourselves first. And if we can't lead ourselves first, then we have no right, no obligation, and really no purpose for leading other people, because we can only lead others to the extent that we're leading ourselves well. So every morning when you awake from slumber, your eyes open your feet touch the floor. The first person you're leading is yourself. If you have a family, you're leading your family in some position. If you're involved in school, you're leading in school. If you're involved in the workplace, even if you're not in a management or leadership position, you're still leading. What most people don't understand is this Every day everybody is leading someone somewhere. The question is how well? And the first answer to that is that man in the mirror, that woman in the mirror moment, when you have to look at yourself and ask the question, how well am I leading myself?

Brigitta Hoeferle:
That is a bit that is a great question. And I'm I'm a I'm fond of great questions. And and almost I'm a question collector almost because I have cards and cards of great questions and they're so simple and yet they are so necessary because like I said, I think most people get managing even as a parent. As a parent, we're leaders. As and we're passing on these patterns because we're looking at all of these patterns in the show. We're passing on these patterns onto our children. We're passing on these patterns onto the people that we work with. Like you said, may we be in a leadership position or not? We're constantly modeling. And I had this conversation just the other day with a leader of a business, and he has two staff members. He has many staff members, but two staff members there. They're constantly bantering back and forth of what's not working and how it's not working. And this is not working. And so I would almost argue that that is a negative leadership strategy, that if you want it or not, it's bleeding over to the other staff members in some sort of fashion. What kind of advice would you give a leader that is dealing with staff like that to have a bigger impact, that it doesn't tip over the culture or doesn't tip over the the overall feeling of the staff, because once the staff is, you know, turned sour, then the whole trying to continue to do business in a in a positive, uplifting, empowering way is rather hard. Would you not say it is?

John Terry:
Yeah. Well, leaders go first. And so the leader of that organization has to lead by example. And one of the things that leader can do in this situation is change the view of what's going on. Because from what I'm hearing you share with me, Raghida, these two individuals are stuck in the present circumstance of the moment. And they see an obstacle, they see a challenge, but they see it as a roadblock or a hindrance. It's an area that they can't climb any higher and they can't move further because in their mind they're stuck. Leaders have an opportunity to help those individuals see the challenge, to see the roadblock, to see the problem as an opportunity waiting to reveal itself and to see and discover a different way of doing things than they've done before. It's going from looking at the present tense of where we are to where do we want to go. And if there's a roadblock in the way there's been a car wreck, what is Waze do? It tells you, take this exit and go a different route to get where you want to go. And as a leader, we have to help our team members understand there's more than one right answer. And just because we've always done it this way doesn't necessarily mean it is the best way or there's not another way that's just as good or potentially better than the way we've always done it. Carly Fiorina in her book Finds Your Way as a great, powerful quote that goes to that says The status quo has great power, but leaders challenge the status quo to change things for the better.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yes. Yes. I love challenging the status quo because there's there's so much rich insight in looking at that. Now, I personally do not have any sort of belt in any martial arts, but both of my children do. They're both black belt kids. Well, they're not kids anymore. They're they're young women, but they both have their black belt. How does martial arts and leadership or what are the patterns or the strategies that martial arts teaches in leadership?

John Terry:
I love I'm glad you asked that question. It's one of my favorite conversations to have, Raghida. And here's why. Ray Kroc, who is the founding really braintrust behind McDonald's, is known for a very famous quote. And that quote is this As long as you're green, you're growing. But once you're right, you start to rot. Nobody wants to work with a rotten leader, but we become rotten leaders when we stop discovering, developing and growing ourselves as leaders. John Maxwell says leaders develop daily, not in a day and in the martial arts. There's a misconception that when you get your black belt, you've arrived, you're the teacher, it's the end all, be all, and you've reached the pinnacle of your career, not the case. In traditional martial arts, the black belt was given once the senior instructor was confident that that individual had the character, the values, the fortitude, and the commitment to not only honor the legacy and the lineage of the family in the art being taught, but they had demonstrated their commitment to the process that they were willing to continue and learn for the rest of their lives. So the black note was given not as a sign that you were an expert or that you were the authority figure, or you were the master of the art. That Black Belt was given as a symbol that you are now a serious student and the journey is only beginning to take you climb one ladder all the way to the top. And when you get to the top and you think you've arrived, there's another ladder that you get to climb. And for a black belt leader, that's it. Your entire life is a journey of learning, discovering and growing, and every day becoming a better version of yourself. That's what it means to be a leader.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I love that. And that resonates so well with me because I remember our daughter, she was 14 and she got her third degree level something, something I can't remember Black Belt, but in her age group, she was not able to continue until she was 16. And back then I thought, well, she's almost 20 now. And I thought, well, that's why would they hold her back? I'm not a fan of holding back. I'm a fan of growing and continuously growing and and and pouring not just into myself because eventually it's going to pour out and and and other people will benefit from it. So I love the explanation that you gave, John, and that makes so much sense. Now, there's martial arts is very ritualized and it is in a really good way. And it's very there's a lot of boundaries and and structure to it. But within there's beautiful flow that creates.

John Terry:
Yeah.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
How have you over the years and I would probably say decades have integrated those boundaries and yet that flow within the boundaries in your leadership organization that you're leading.

John Terry:
When you talk about the martial arts and the boundaries that are involved, there is a structure that's there. And every good individual, every good leader has to build structure and processes around them so that they know what needs to be done and they know the process so they can teach it to others. If you're constantly shooting from the hip and you don't have structure and process, you're going to be ineffective as a leader because you don't have the ability to do that. In my core system, which is sure, Andrew, we learn a series of forms that we call cutters and they start with a very basic form and they get a little more complicated with each form, building on the other, teaching additional principles and concepts of self defense that you need to learn to be able to be an effective fighter and you can defend yourself in the martial arts. The same is true in leadership. As you're bringing somebody into your organization, they need a framework to start and processes so that they can see success. But as they demonstrate success in those areas, you need additional processes and additional services and resources that they have available to them that they can grow into. So they're continually developing and growing themselves as leaders so that they have an opportunity to see success.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
How do you read? So. So there is that structure, right? There's that the the framework, as you called it. And yet there's that being in flow in the inside of the framework, there's got to be some sort of, you know, in business we have agreements and we have boundaries. How do you enforce those agreements and boundaries in the best way?

John Terry:
It has to be accountability. And to me, that's an essential character quality of what it means to be a black belt leader. In my book, Black Belt Leadership 101, I talk about the ten essential character qualities of what is required to become a black belt leader in life. It starts with belief, believing that there is a black belt leader within you and that you have been endowed by your Creator with a passion and all of the tools you need within you. You then go within and discover and develop that in the learning phase. But then there has to be accountability. Accountability to yourself. Accountability to the individuals that are mentoring and growing you. But also, there has to be accountability to those that are on your team and those that you are working with. And when everyone is mutually accountable to each other, understanding that together we're working to achieve a goal or an objective, the goal of the leader is to rally the team and to equip the team so that together you cross the finish line as a team. A leader is not the person that crosses the finish line first. A leader equips every member of the team. So as a group you get to the end of that particular goal or objective together. You step across that line together and you celebrate success or the lack thereof as a result of the efforts of the team. And if you don't have accountability, an agreement is really worthless, because if you can't agree to be accountable to the paper, it's just a piece of paper.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
You just you just said you're you're celebrating or not celebrating. What what has what the result is? And I feel like, especially today or nowadays, everyone's a winner. But if everyone's a winner, there's no learning. Right? If we're if we're taking if we're if we're not taking the feedback, what are the learnings? And as a leader, I think it's our it's our job to or our responsibility to look at what do we learn from this? Yes, I agree with you 100%. I'm all about celebrating, but I'm not about celebrating the things that don't work. Not everyone gets a trophy. Not everyone gets a pat on the back. That's right. Sometimes we have to look at. Yeah, what's the learning in that? What would you call that?

John Terry:
You can't have success without failure. It's the yin and the yang. If you want to look at it from that perspective, if you have nothing to measure success against, then you have no ability to see success. One of the greatest teachers, the most successful people in the life of their success. Two is the fact that they failed early, they failed often, and they failed forward. Thomas Edison As an example, when asked about the incandescent light bulb and all of his failures before he got there, he didn't complain about the failures. He said, What did I learn from my failure? I learned a thousand ways not to invent the incandescent light bulb. Failure, rightly used, can allow us to see what doesn't work so that it will also reveal what is still yet untested and untried to see what can work and as a result of that, failure can be one of the greatest driving forces to help us see long term success. If we embrace it as an opportunity to learn, to discover what didn't work, to learn the lessons that we made in that failure so that we don't repeat that, and then we can go on to be even more successful in life.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, those learnings are big. Would you say that that would be one of the most important things that a new leader. Would be beneficial for a new leader to learn how to learn from.

John Terry:
Yeah. For a leader to be successful, they've got to be tested. And any time you're tested, you're going to have wins and you're going to have losses. Learning from both. Learning from what you did well at work and are there ways to improve it? Again, not being content with the status quo and then also learning from what didn't work as well as we expected it to or hope that it would. And looking inside of that to see what can we do differently to create a better outcome?

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So that's one of the most important things. What is the most most important thing? What's the number one thing?

John Terry:
To me, the most important thing is the belief component of that. If you don't believe in who you are, you don't believe in what you have been called to do and what your Creator has put you on the earth to uniquely accomplish. The goal, the dream, the objective, that big, hairy, audacious idea that you have. If you don't believe that you have it within you to do that and you don't believe that your goal or your objective or your dream is worthy of pursuit, nothing else matters because you're never going to pursue it. What you don't believe in, you are never going to pursue. You're never going to take action to bring that dream, that belief into its physical representation on the Earth. And so to me, the number one most important thing for a leader to have, and it's the first character quality I talk about in my book, is believing that there is a black belt leader within you waiting to be discovered, developed and deployed. So you can learn to be a master of your life and learn to be a master leader that grows and develops and trains other leaders.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. Wow. The belief I actually wrote it down. You said the first two that what you're talking about in your book and I want to hear what people can get your book is belief and then accountability. And I'd love to learn more what all the ten points are. And in order to do that, folks need to get your book and I need to get your book. And I think it's back there on the on your table as well, I think.

John Terry:
Over here behind me. Yes, ma'am.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
There was a question that just came up. Oh, yeah. This morning I did a training. And the question or the the concept of what Napoleon Hill speaks about in thinking grow rich of the mastermind and the people that he surrounds himself and his imaginary mastermind who are one or two people that. Probably already sit on your mastermind, either in imagination or in real life. Who are those people?

John Terry:
You know, I'm very fortunate to have the privilege to be personally mentored by Dr. John Maxwell. And even at a higher level from the individual that leads Dr. John's companies. And that's Mark Cole. And Mark has been just a phenomenal mentor in my life. And as a result of Mark, Dr. John and other incredible individuals in my life, I've had an opportunity to surround myself with some amazing individuals. Wayne Nance, the founder of Real Life Management, who has got one of the most unique behavioral psychographic understandings of human behavior, is one of the individuals I have an opportunity to learn from. One of my early pastors in my life is a very brilliant man when it comes to money, and he's had an opportunity to venture me that there's been an incredible number of individuals that personally mentored me. But I've also learned that you can go to this place called Amazon.com on the Internet, and you can have an opportunity to get the books that successful men and women have written. And you can be mentored through their writings to learn from their insight, their wisdom, their successes and their failures. And as a result of that, you can also be mentored from afar by individuals that you admire, that you want to learn from. And as a result of that, it creates that daily opportunity to learn, to grow and become a better version of you.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. Because I want to go back to what I said at the very, very beginning. When we learn and we grow, we're actually putting it in place or well, I don't want to shit all over you guys, but you should put it in action, do it. And through that, you're modeling what you have learned to others. That's right. And you're basically teaching others if you want to or not. And I think we got a really good hang of that concept when it comes to things that we really don't want to model to other people or that we really don't want other people to learn from us. But if it goes if if it works in a non supportive way, it actually works in a supportive way too. So that's the good news here. If you would peel back all of the layers and all of the onions and you could strip your success pattern or your model of what you are teaching, could you simplify it and share it with us?

John Terry:
Absolutely. It's a very simple process and I learned it years and years ago from my father, and I've continued that on through my six children and the opportunity to work with individuals and organizations for the last 30 plus years. And it's this every day going back to what Ray Kroc said, grain, you're growing ripe. You're running every day when you wake up. Your goal that day is to become 1% better today than you were yesterday. And the goal tomorrow is to become 1% better tomorrow than you became today. And if you can consistently become 1% better and who can't become 1% better? If you can become 1% better every single day and just over three months, three months and two weeks, 100 days, you become 100% better than you were the day before. And what happens as a result of that, as you become a better version of yourself, the endless opportunities that have always been in front of you all of a sudden appear because your belief in yourself and what you are able to accomplish and do and what you're able to rally those around you to do with you, that confidence level is much higher and as a result of the excess that you experience over and over again, that success builds that motivation to see those opportunities, to seize them and to make them become physical reality as you achieve success in yet another area of your life. But it's in that growing, it's in that learning, and it's in that every day I'm going to do what is necessary for me to get better that that happens.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah. You said something earlier, and I didn't write it down, but I want you to repeat it if you remember what you said. Because sometimes people say, Can you repeat that? And I go, I don't know, what did I say? You said something. I think it was a quote of Dr. Maxwell. It was leadership happens daily, not in a day.

John Terry:
Develop daily, not in a day.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Leaders develop daily, not in a day. I love.

John Terry:
That. And so that's that 1% better philosophy of every day when you wake up, spend the first 30 minutes reading a book, listening to a podcast, watching a video of a successful person that you want to model, and then take a few minutes to reflect on that. And what am I going to do today to apply that in my life? And then at the end of the day reflect on what happened that worked well. What worked okay, where you've failed, what you learn from that, and then spend another 30 minutes reading, listening to a podcast, watching a video, growing yourself. If you can book into your day and do that every single day, you can't help but grow, learn, mature, and become a much, much better version of yourself every single day.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I love the book. Ending gives me a good visual. How do people find out more about you, John, and your book and all of the greatness that you bring to the table share with us?

John Terry:
Yeah, the easiest way to find me is to go to my website, be a black belt leader because everybody is leading. So why just be a leader when you can be a black belt leader, be a black belt leader dot com. You can go to the contact us page. You'll find all of my social media there. You can also go to Facebook.com, backslash, be a black belt leader and connect with me there and follow what I do. Daily content, daily tips, ideas and resources that are available to you to learn how to become that better black belt leader and learn to master your life and master your leadership.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Love it. And I think you also came bearing gifts, did you not?

John Terry:
I did, absolutely.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
What'd you bring us?

John Terry:
One of the big challenges I see with people where they struggle to lead again goes back to that be that initial belief and not believing in themselves. It's a lack of self confidence. One of my newest books that I wrote just a few months ago and released is called Master Your Self Confidence How to Silence that limiting, nagging voice in the back of Your Head. They keep saying, I can't and replace that with I can't. The easiest way to find that is to go to be a black belt leader. Click on the Courses tab. You'll see master your self-confidence there. And if you enter the code esteem esteem you'll be able to get that course for free. As my gift to Raghida and all of her followers for the opportunity to do with you today.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Wow, that's a humongous gift. I sure hope that you guys are going to do that. So master your self confidence. How to silence your voice of self doubt. Go to be a black belt leader, be a black belt leader all one word, click on the courses, click on master your self confidence and then get the the coupon code is esteem esteem. John This has been such an incredible conversation with you and such richness and nuggets of leadership, and I thank you for taking the time. I thank you for pouring not just into me, but into our entire followers and sharing the gifts that you bring and that you clearly are here to serve to others with. So thank you for being here. I appreciate you.

John Terry:
I am so honored for the invitation. Thank you for what you do, Brigida, and thanks for the opportunity to share it today.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Thank you. Thank you, John. And guys, we will see each other again next Tuesday, same time, same place with another wonderful guest expert. Be surprised who I'm going to have next week. So see you then. Thank you and bye for now. Thank you for tuning in to the Success Pattern Show at www.TheSuccessPatternShow.com. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle.

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John Terry

A two-time martial arts Hall of Fame inductee, John Terry helps people discover, develop, and deploy their own Black Belt Leader Within as they go on a lifelong quest to become their Best. He's a 2-time best-selling author and an international speaker, coach, & trainer. John is the founder of Black Belt Leadership and also serves as President of Real Life Management. He currently serves as an Executive Director and President's Council Advisory Member of The John Maxwell Team and is a 2021 recipient of the Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award.

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