Special Guest Expert - Jessie Terry

Special Guest Jessie Terry.mp4: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Jessie Terry.mp4: this eJwljslqwzAURX_FaNGVsfCg2DWE0lUnuihJoF0ZIT27wpqqwa4J-ffKdHmHd969ImZ0AB2GsFlAPXpEORLaB6oZDIKjvmpJV9U1yRGLPhgVPbj_4FAeGlLliDJmYiLsZt3dk7LN0ShA8kFTtTNHISFh55W6yaP-iqKTyf4Owfoe43Vdi8mYSQK1whfMKMydWAAvFd5PPS4_5-65iaQ91fJlmy_E1l8tLO8_TL6dP6bq94HKcFTABb3zJjoGR25WLQ3ll_QqR0EEuS85WWCCyuwpgg_ZK3gvIDuDc1uhbJOKo3GKhtTc5e32B1bjYGU:1nZb03:MpyIldmVncRiSc7HvnrXD6CZITc video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back? They're dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question. And the answers are right here. My name is Bridget Follett, and this is the Success Pattern Show. And welcome, everyone. Happy Tuesday, you guys. Welcome to the Success Pattern Show, where we're all about learn, do teach and really shine some light on what is the success pattern. My name is Bridget HEFFEL and the founder of the Success Pattern Movement and the CEO of the Center of NLP. We are all about decoding success so you can encode your success with the patterns of success that you're learning from our guest experts today, and I say this every week, but this week I'm. I. It's it's it's. I'm on the edge of my seat because we have a young leader here with us. And I'll tell you all about her in a second. So success is learned best hands on from living teachers.

Speaker1:
And that's what we're all about at the center of NLP and the Success Pattern Show. And you're here at the right place at the right time as you're filling your knowledge bank account with great deposits of these success patterns. As one of the laws of success teaches that success is modeled, and that's exactly what we're about. We're modeling success as we are breaking it down into its patterns. And that's why what we're sharing here, the success patterns, to give you insight of how highly successful people are realizing their steps to success, because success is also is is already yours, and success has a different meaning for everyone. So stay tuned. At the end of the show, we have a very special gift for you. And today, as I said, is a great show with a great young leader. I have a beautiful, wise, strategically motivated person, young person, 22 years of age here with us. And the value that you're getting today of this young person is that she has an incredible opportunity to add value to these gen gen Zs out there. She inspires young people not just to chase their dreams, but to turn their dreams into action plans so they can then be reality.

Speaker1:
Her name is Jessie Terry. She's a pay close attention to this because that's a success pattern all in itself. She's a John Maxwell coach and speaker. She's a model and she's an inspector for the Arkansas State Athletic Commission, which means that she keeps fighters in check. So, boy, oh, boy. And she's the only female in the whole state of Arkansas that does that. She's running for the title of Miss Arkansas USA in April. Actually, I think that's next weekend. She inspires young people to knock out boredom and bring back the power of the imagination. Well, she speaks my language. She's written seven children's books. She's in the process of creating a 30 day creativity. We're not going to talk about that. She teaches 30 character development lessons and helps develop them into effective leaders. She is competitive. She is an incredible, beautiful woman. She was a cage fight. She was in a cage fight last year, won and then got paid to go model at the New York Fashion Week. Ladies and gentlemen, if you're sitting down, this is a good time to stand on your feet and welcome, Miss Jessie Terry. And the crowd goes, Oh, Jessie, it's so good to have you here.

Speaker2:
Thank you. I'm so glad to be here. It's exciting. I've been waiting for a month and a half to get on the show, so I'm like, Yes, it's finally here.

Speaker1:
You are here and you are at the right place at the right time. And, you know, we I'm talking about success. And some people might say, oh, well, you know, she's 22. What does she know about success? What do you know about success? Where do we even begin?

Speaker2:
Jessie I think I can attribute most of my success to my parents. It was being homeschooled and watching how they modeled it. It was a lot of trial and error and realizing, You know what, I may not know everything, but. But they do. They know a lot. So I was always following their lead and that's really got me to where I am today. So I contribute my success to my parents for sure.

Speaker1:
Yeah, and great parents you have. I met both of them and they're beautiful beings. And because they're such beautiful beings, it makes it easy for for you to be not just on the outside. And I've gotten to know you now. It is the wisdom that you carry within you. It is the it's the care that you carry within you. There's a tremendous balance of doing good in the world, of helping others, of helping kids and having this big heart, but also having this very wise, driven characteristics characteristic within you. What? Specifically makes you want to go and jump out of bed in the morning and tackle the day.

Speaker2:
Well, it's definitely my love for children. I've been privileged to have such an amazing life and have parents that pour into me. But I see these young kids who don't have that same opportunity. So when I wake up in the morning, it's how can I add value? How can I reach the life of a child today? So I've had the amazing opportunity to help raise my nieces and nephew, and they've really inspired so much of what I've done. I started writing children's books because I saw there was a lack of creativity and imagination because the phone and the Internet's put right in front of kids. It's not go out and play with the sword. It's let's just watch YouTube because we don't have to do anything else. So when I saw that need for creativity, I started writing books that would bring that back into the lives of young kids.

Speaker1:
Wow. And it's brought out by your nieces and nephews. But there's a there's a deeper calling in that. When did that start? When did that calling start?

Speaker2:
When I was six years old, God told me that one day you're going to impact lots of children. I'm like, But I'm only six. What am I going to do? And I just started serving by giving toys to my friends. And now I have done a toy drive last year where I donated 780 toys to the Children's Hospital in Arkansas. And this year my goal is to donate 2000. So it's always finding something to give back to kids. And it's just been incredible to get to serve and to see the faces of the young kids when they say, I'm going to wake up on Christmas morning and have something special, it's just exciting. And my nieces get to help pick out the toys and it makes them feel like they're involved as well.

Speaker1:
Well, they don't just feel like they're involved. They are involved. And you're involving them. And and you were six years old. So there was a decision that you made when you were six. That was do you remember what that decision was like? Did you just wake up or did something happen or did you hear or see something?

Speaker2:
It was like a feeling in my heart that I just love kids and my mom. So even when I was little, I'd have a book and a baby doll in my hands. And it was always just this desire to serve kids and young people. Even now that I'm writing books for kids, I'm on the John Maxwell team and they're doing an amazing job serving youth. And I thought, What about the elementary school kids? So I'm in the process of working on something that's going to help serve elementary school kids. And my books are the main cause of that because they need to they need leadership just as much as a youth does, I think.

Speaker1:
Yes, and I agree I agree with you wholeheartedly. And I think it's especially those kids that need that kind of leadership. Right. And I know that you were speaking on a John Maxwell stage just, what, two or three weeks ago. Yeah, tell me about that.

Speaker2:
So what they have is called stage time. So if you're in the mentorship program, you have an opportunity to audition, to speak on stage. And I thought, okay, I don't have enough to do already, so let me just go for it. I had done it once when I was 18, so I auditioned and then I made semifinals. I thought, No way, this is crazy. I got to send in one more video and then I find out I made the finals. I'm going to be speaking on stage. So two weeks ago I got to talk in front of 2000 people about my cage fights and what I learned from that. It was crazy and amazing and I have a really cute trophy now.

Speaker1:
You have a cute trophy. You talked about your stage fight. I want to learn more about the stage fight because out of that, you won. Well, I'm going to let you talk about it because I know the I know the end and I know the result that came out of that. So how do how does how does a beautiful girl like you get into stage fights? That's the first.

Speaker2:
Question. My dad, he is the reason for that. So when I was younger, I was bullied pretty badly and my parents said, you've got to have something that's going to help you build your confidence. So when I was about six, I started doing karate. I was in gymnastics and I thought, I want to do what my brother does. I want to fight too. I want to, I want to train. So I started doing karate and up until I was about 12, I did that. And then last year, 2020, I had the opportunity to work for the Arkansas State Athletic Commission and one of the coaches said you should come and train and do kickboxing with us. And I said, Yes, please, I'll be there on Monday. And within three months I stepped into a cage and I fought. But it was not an easy journey. Everyone was saying, You're a beauty queen. You don't need to do that. You're going to mess up your face. And I thought, I can just model medicine. That'll be good. And I ended up winning my fight and it was incredible. I learned so much from it.

Speaker1:
What was the what was the biggest lesson that you took away from that stage fight?

Speaker2:
So when I was training, I had a lot of opposition and people telling me, well, you can't do it, and I had to overcome the adversity. So it was a lot of overcoming and not listening to the negative voices because they can really tear you down. There were times when I thought, Well, maybe they're right. Maybe I shouldn't be doing this. And if I hadn't gone through with it, I would have never had the opportunity to step into a cage and bloody a girl's nose. That was the best part.

Speaker1:
So. So you won. You went in there, you won. And then out of that, I know that you shared with me earlier what came out of that?

Speaker2:
Yeah. So after the fight, I ended up going and competing for a state pageant. I didn't win, but I had an amazing opportunity from that. One of my pageant coaches had reached out to me and said, There's an opportunity for you to go to New York and do Fashion Week. And the girls dad that I had fought. He said, Well, I'll help sponsor you to go. And I thought, Yes, please, you can give me your money and I'll go. And it was incredible and it was amazing to have him pour into me. And even though I beat up his daughter, he was like, I'll still help you out. So it was great.

Speaker1:
There. There is so much richness in overcoming adversity like that and then even being supported by someone that you won against. And that shows the kind of people that you surround yourself with really make all the difference. They're not people that are now ignoring you or calling you whatever one would be called. There's there's support. So you're receiving support. And it appears that through your entire life, not just your family, but the extension of your family, your John Maxwell family, you're the people that have coached you and supported you, have really made an impact and you are now passing that on to others. What would you say if someone really tips you off? What would you say is the value that they your value within you that they validate or that they violate most?

Speaker2:
Well, I would say that when someone says something to you, what I tell my niece is when they get bullied at school, is is what they say true? Is that going to matter in five years that they said, your hair doesn't look cute or something like that? So my parents have always said what someone says to you doesn't prove that it's true. You have value. God created you to be this beautiful woman. So why would you let them get you down? So even though the words might hurt, you got to say I know who I am in Christ, and that's not going to get me down.

Speaker1:
And what beautiful words. And we have a comment here and I want to put it in here really quick. Black Belt Leadership says, hey, Jay-Z, so excited to see you. Sharing your insight and wisdom on the success pattern show. Can't wait to hear about Ebenezer s latest adventures. Who's Ebenezer?

Speaker2:
That is the first character I created when I started writing kids books. I had just gotten back from Africa and I thought, You know what? I'm going to write a book. My dad's writing books. I can write more books than him. And it became a competition. And then I created this little character named Ebenezer. He's a yellow monster who loves pink overalls, and he goes to a school where creativity and imagination is unaccepted and allowed. So they have to use their gifts and talents to bring it back into the school where it is not allowed. And if you want to read the book, it'll tell you what happens because I'm not going to spoil it for you.

Speaker1:
So there's a cliffhanger there, and I sure hope that you're going to share later on how people can get in touch with you and learn more about Ebenezer, his adventures. We're going to talk about that later on when, you know, you're a you're a very bright, spirited and and and wise and fun person. And one might say, oh, you seem to be jumping on that bandwagon of positive thinking. What does positive thinking mean to you?

Speaker2:
Yeah, so you can. My mom always tells me you have to roll your emotions or they're going to rule you. And at first I thought, oh, I don't want to hear that. And then I started repeating it. So my nieces, I'm like, Oh my gosh. But it's so true. What you say affects what you do, and being positive will cause you to have either a really great experience or if you're negative, it's going to bring you down. So positive thinking is so, so important. What you say affects your life. So I try to be very positive. Even when people say, Well, you're just 22, you just quit your job to be an entrepreneur. That's crazy. But I know that if I'm positive I put in the work, it's going to pay off.

Speaker1:
And through all of the work that you do and you have a lot on your plate, you shared with us that you're doing your bathroom right now and you're drawing a mural. Not from a stencil, but you're drawing a mural of what? On the bathroom.

Speaker2:
I'm doing my whole bathroom in a Spider-Man theme. My nieces and I just saw all the Spider-Man movies, and we all love it. So I thought, well, before my mom does the bathroom and makes it look classy, let's make it look marvel. So I'm doing it all in Spider-Man and Venom and it looks really cool. It just taking forever.

Speaker1:
It's so you've been you've been working on it for how long now?

Speaker2:
Since December. Just off and on. Since December when I get free time.

Speaker1:
So three months. So with all of the things, the page and the and the the your your writing and all of the things that you do, how do you motivate yourself if that's even a term I want to use with you, but for lack of a better. How do you motivate yourself?

Speaker2:
Well, it's a lot of thinking. If I sit down and I'm lazy right now, what is that going to do next year? When I go to the John Maxwell event and all these people said, What did you do during the year? How did you add value to someone else? So sometimes I feel absolutely no motivation, but motivation comes when you're doing the work. Like when I like to I like to work out, I like to stay active, but sometimes I don't want to get up and work out in the morning. But when I'm doing it, then the motivation comes and I realize I've worked out for 2 hours, so sometimes you don't feel it, but it comes in the process.

Speaker1:
I want to learn because that's a success pattern right there. What you might tell your know, the first thought is, I really don't want to get up. I don't want to work out. And I know that we've all been there, right? We've had that conversation like a full fledged conversation with ourselves because I know I've been there. What is it that you first see, hear, feel or do when you tell yourself that you don't want to do it?

Speaker2:
Well, I think about my experiences with getting to do missions trips. I've been able to go to Africa and Guatemala and Costa Rica, and I look at these people who have almost nothing and they work with what they have and they keep going. And I think if they can make a difference in what the little they have, what am I doing sitting here being lazy? It's just you have to think about that. They have nothing, but they give you everything. When I went to Guatemala the day after high school graduation, I was told I could choose where I wanted to go and I said, I want to go and do a mission trip like my brother did. And we were up building stoves in the mountains. And this man said, I'd never seen a stove, I've heard about it. And he had saved this Coca Cola for a year to share with us. And he said, This is what I want to give you. You had almost nothing, but he still gave us what he have had. And I thought, well, that's my motivation right there is they have little and they give us everything.

Speaker1:
What a what a beautiful lesson in at your young age to acknowledge that and to learn from others that that don't have anything or have very little in comparison to you, rather than it allowing you to be dragged down by it but be inspired by it. That inspiration does that outweigh and I'm going to speak to something that is very common in young adults like you or even younger. Is that is that on the other side of overwhelm and anxiety that a lot of people are experiencing these days? How do you tackle that?

Speaker2:
Yes. So when I get overwhelmed or just like I feel like I have so much going on, I step back and I take a break. Sometimes you have to do that for yourself. You have to take even if it's just 30 minutes to sit down and rest, that's what I have to do. And I have to rely and know that God has got me and he's not going to give me more than I can't handle. So it just taking that time to even if it's just 5 minutes to lock yourself away from all the kids that are screaming and asking you to go jump on the trampoline, you just have to take that rest.

Speaker1:
So you do jump on the trampoline with the other. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Whether you're with your nieces and nephews. Yes. Are you like the cool aunt?

Speaker2:
I try to be. My sister does a good job with the kids, but since they're with me more often, I try to be the extra fun one.

Speaker1:
What what do you what kind of advice or success pattern do you have for young women in your age that might not be as privileged and maybe privilege is not the right word, but I'm going to use it right now to grow up in an incredible, supportive family like you are. What advice do you have for them?

Speaker2:
I would tell them that God has given everyone a dream and a purpose and that no matter what you have, you can still accomplish that. If I look at some of the I have a friend from Bangladesh who had nothing and she was on the John Maxwell team. She had been adopted out of this horrible situation and now she wants to go back to her country and become the Prime Minister. So even if you don't have a lot, you can still get to a point in your life where you can make a difference. You just got to start. It's taking that first step and saying, You know what? I might not have a lot, but I've got a phone, I can talk to a friend. It's just the little steps that can get you to change the world.

Speaker1:
Pure wisdom right there. And do you think that the more one has, the more in overwhelm they get because it's just so much that's available? You talked about social media earlier on YouTube and all of those things. Do you feel that that gives an opportunity to get into overwhelm quicker?

Speaker2:
It depends on how you use it. Social media can be a tool and it also can be something that tears people down because of social media, the suicide rate has gone up, but at the same time, the social media has been a wonderful thing because most of my friends are international, so I have the chance to talk to them on a daily basis. So it really depends on how you use it and what you're putting out, because if you're being negative, you could really hurt someone. But if you're using social media for a positive, you can change someone's life.

Speaker1:
That is very well spoken and I totally agree with you on that. Now, we talked earlier a little bit about Ebenezer, and I want to hear more about not his adventures, but how do people learn more about Ebenezer and maybe even order the books and and learn more on how they can support you and do incredible, great work with other children?

Speaker2:
Well, actually, my dad, he spent time helping me create this really cool website called Ebenezer Journal dot com. And it was just really nice for him to help me set it up. And you can go on the website and you can look at each character and it gives a brief synopsis of each one, something they like, where they live and their favorite things. So you can learn about each character and then you can order any of my seven books on there. And then there's my contact information and I even have some free coloring pages that you can download and color with the kids. Or if you're a kid at heart, you can do that as well.

Speaker1:
I agree with you on that. Coloring is definitely not just for the kids so Ebenezer Journal dot com is where you where you can go on the contact page scroll down and download the free coloring pages and folks can also go and order one of your seven books or check guys while you're at it, get all of them.

Speaker2:
And if you want to get them in like a larger quantity, you can reach out to me personally and I can get you a really good deal on the books.

Speaker1:
So a good deal for larger quantity. I want to support you with that and I'm going to buy the whole set for my school. I have a montessori school, so they're going to get a whole set and learn more about Ebenezer, this journal. And you know, many years ago, I have what I have done in supporting authors. I bought the book, I bought one for myself and I bought another maybe two, three, four, five, depending on how many libraries I have around me. And I donated it to the libraries. So now we can also go from one to many because there are people in the library that are always looking for great books. So I love that you have created or thank you to your dad that he has created or helped you create the website Ebenezer Journal dot com is the website that you want to go on and get your coloring pages and get the books. And then how do people follow you and follow your journey?

Speaker2:
Well, I have Instagram and Facebook. My name on Facebook is just Jesse Terry and I post so much on social media. So if you go in there, I have all the links to my LinkedIn and my Instagram and my YouTube account, so you can just go on to my Facebook and that's where I'm most active.

Speaker1:
So Jesse Terry, they can find you under Jesse Terry on Instagram. Tik Tok.

Speaker2:
I do have to talk. I do all my special effects makeup on, tick tock.

Speaker1:
Special effects makeup and I can't wait. Maybe you also do a tick tock video about your bathroom makeover because I really intrigued. I want to see what that looks like now.

Speaker2:
I'll send you a picture.

Speaker1:
Yes, I'd love that. I'll share it with everyone. So, guys, get in touch with Jesse, get your books, find out more from Ebony Users Adventures. And I want to leave today with one last question. If you can think back to your entire 22 years, and I'm pretty sure you remember a majority of them, what would you say is like a a constant pattern that has been driving you that leads you to success however you define success, what is a recurring constant?

Speaker2:
Yeah. So if I think about my 22 years, what stands out to me the most would have to be just being able to serve kids. When I went to Costa Rica a couple of years ago, I got to teach women's self-defense and leadership to kids and just seeing how they want so much from you and all you just have to do is share what you've learned and just getting to work with the kids and help the families know that they can get out of those situations and teach them self defense. Just being able to pour into them and showing them that they can be leaders too. It was just incredible.

Speaker1:
So pouring pouring into others and and and assisting and supporting others. And therefore, you will be assisted and supported as well. What an incredible success pattern from a young, wise woman. Guys, please. I'm going to post it in here again. Follow Jesse Ebenezer Journal dot com. Find her on TikTok find her on Instagram Facebook and Facebook.

Speaker2:
I do.

Speaker1:
Yeah, Facebook. Learn from her, follow her, support her. That is a success pattern all in itself. Jesse, thank you so much for taking the time. I know that you're super busy and productive and you're going to go and babysit. I think now we're done here. Get with Jesse. Jesse, Terry, I will see you very soon. For the viewers of our Success Pattern Show today, tune in again next Tuesday, same time, same place for another incredible success Pattern Show. Thank you for tuning in to the Success Pattern Show at WW. The Success Pattern Show. My name is Brigitta Phyllis.

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Jessie Terry

My name is Jessie Terry. I am a John Maxwell coach and speaker, I am a model as well as an inspector for the ASAC. I am running for the title of Miss Arkansas USA in April. I inspire young people to knock out boredom and bring back the power of the imagination. I have written 7 children's books.

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