Special Guest Expert - Jeremy Cline

Special Guest Expert - Jeremy Cline: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Jeremy Cline: this eJwljl1LwzAUhv9KyYVXpbVf6ywMEUHnwCEOQXZTQnJao_kyOVkYY__dFC_fj_Oc90KY0QgaRzxbIAN5IDkR2iPVDEbByVD33bpumi4nLHg0Knhw_8GqWrVdnRPKmAmJsJjN-q6r-pxMAiQfNVULcxISEvYnUjd7MlxIcDLZX4jWD2UZYyxmY2YJ1ApfMKNK7sQJylNdLqe-rKq346527RNurXnRSsvf90972MfjuP2-3fev91TiRgEX9Mab4BhsuIlaGso_0qucoEC5LDlYYILK7DmAx2wHDtQ5e5RCQ6Fsm4qTcYpiai7yev0DeNRgkg:1neisE:dxFn5STrq0vyng3k4WDxKFf9gqU video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back their dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question. And the answers are right here. My name is Bridget Russell and this is the Success Pattern Show. And that is right. Welcome everyone to the Success Pattern Show. My name is Bridget. Hopefully I could not be more honored and excited to be here with you as we in the show put the do in learn, do teach, the founder of the Success Patterns Movement and the CEO of the Center of NLP. And you hear success patterns show. What does that mean? Well, can we agree that success is a really interesting thing because it shapes its meaning when within each individual success seeker it's not limited to either your business or personal life. It can be either or. And often it bubbles in from one to the other. And success is such a unique concept. It gives the scaffolding scaffolding to build our own empire. The patterns part is the true definition of pattern is an example for others to follow. So we're really taking and peeling back the layers here as we are decoding the patterns of other people, of successful people that has led to success for them of our guest experts. And boy, are you in for a treat again today, so you can then encode this to your own success starting today, as humans were hardwired for hands on application by living teachers, because clearly we're not theoreticians because we walk the walk and we talk the talk.

Speaker1:
Theoreticians just talk a good game. We are grandmasters at work here. The good news for you, that means that you're at the right place at the right time. And one of the laws of success that I teach states that success is modeled. And that's exactly what we're here about. We're modeling success patterns so you can implement them in your own life so you can realize the steps to success because success is already yours. So stay tuned. At the end of the show, we have a very special gift for you that is a guideline and a reminder of the laws of success. And today I have an incredible guest for you. And here's what you're going to get out of not just listening to me, because I'm not going to be the talking head here. But what we're really the value that we're giving our guest today comes all across from the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, and he describes the importance of being true to your values and the steps that one can take to unearth those values. And also provide productivity hacks that have learned others to avoid reinventing the wheel. Now, how many of you have ever reinvented or tried to reinvent the wheel? Right. Yeah. Don't do it. Because that's why we have success patterns show and our guest experts here.

Speaker1:
So you don't have to reinvent the wheel. There's actually already patterns there that you can use. My guest today is Jeremy Klein all the way over from England. He resides right now between London and Cambridge. He's a transitioning attorney. He's in career coaching right now. We're going to hear a little bit more about that. He's the host and that's how I got to know him of the Change Work Life podcast with 128 episodes. And it's all about beating the Sunday Evening Blues, enjoying enjoying Mondays. Again, how many of you want to enjoy Mondays? I know I do. I love Mondays and I love Fridays and I love every other day of the week as well. So through his interviews with ordinary people, there are able to show the actions to take a path of their career and their career coaches that help them. And he explores those changes anyone can make to enjoy a better working life. Whether the changes are small, day to day altering, day to day routines all the way to major, major career shifts or something in between. After 15 years, Jeremy has spent largely furthering other people's dreams, and he started to wonder whether he was going to end his career thinking, Hmm, really? Is this really what 40 years working life is? So he started in 2019, October 2019, the Change Work Life podcast to find out what else is out there. So, ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome Mr. Jeremy Klein. Jeremy, it's so good to have you here. Thank you for being here.

Speaker2:
It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you so much for inviting me on your show.

Speaker1:
So we have spent some time on your show and I know a little bit about you, your transitioning attorney. You have gone into career coaching. How did that come about? How did you get into that? Well, how did you get into becoming an attorney? And then how did you get in? How did you get into not being an attorney?

Speaker2:
How long have we got? No, that's all. That's all. Very, very good questions. The idea of becoming an attorney was implanted to me, aged, I think it was 14, when my best friend at school said to me, You are always arguing you should be a lawyer. And somehow the idea stuck. And I thought about a few other careers at the time, but even at age 14, that was the one that just stuck and continued to stick. And I decided from that to do a law degree. I decided that I was going to become an attorney and I did that. I qualified, and I've been doing it ever since. And it was really it was probably six or so, five or six years ago where I really started to think, okay, I'm doing this, I'm good at what I do, but am I really enjoying it? Am I truly getting up every day thinking, Well, this is what I get to do for a living? And I was concluding that the answer was no, not really. But then the question was, okay, but is that just work? I mean, isn't that most people's experience? Most people, they do their jobs. And, you know, it's not necessarily awful, but neither is it necessarily something that makes you bounce out of bed every morning thinking you're lucky stars that you were just so fortunate to be doing what you're doing.

Speaker2:
And it took me a while to realize that it doesn't necessarily have to be that way. Work doesn't necessarily have to be just a bit, man, you know, neither truly awful, but neither truly wonderful either. And so that was really where the journey of discovery began. I had it in mind that I wanted to start my own thing, that I wanted to have the freedom and flexibility of starting my own business. But I didn't really know what that was going to be. I was getting into podcasts at the time. I was learning a bit about the world of online business, and so I thought, I'll start a podcast and I'll make it about career change. I'll speak to people who've done it. I'm fortunate that the town where I live has got quite an entrepreneurial streak to it, so I knew that I could find guests locally as well as worldwide who had been through career transitions and listen to their stories and learn from their stories. And it's been amazing. I've spoken to some fantastic people, including this Brigitta Haefele, a person who had a very, very good conversation with her and. Yeah, the podcast was going well, but I realized that I wasn't sure necessarily what I wanted to do with it because when I started I thought, Oh yeah, I'll just get a few tens of thousands of downloads and you know, no problem, get money from sponsorship, that kind of thing.

Speaker2:
And anyone who started a podcast in the past year or so knows that trying to get ten downloads, let alone 10,000 downloads, is really quite challenging. And so I explored a few business ideas and had some coaching myself. And through that coaching realized and it's kind of obvious from the podcast when I think about it, I mean the podcast I get to speak to people, I get to ask questions, I get to be curious. And so it was kind of staring me in the face that coaching was sort of the obvious extension from that, but it took being coached myself to realize that. And so I have just started. I've got a handful of clients who I've been working with, but so far, you know, you never really know that you enjoy something until you try it out. But so far I'm really getting a buzz from it and I can see that there is definitely the potential that if I do this for a living, I'm going to be someone who does get out of bed every day thinking, Wow, I can't believe I get to do this.

Speaker1:
And and with the oh, my gosh, so many questions. So the first question or the first statement that comes up out of that is, by golly, you could have you can do case study after case study with 128 episodes. You could do a lot of case studies with just that. But I know that that's not what you why you did it. And I find it fascinating that you going into coaching and consulting with the incredible background as an attorney, not an attorney that has just begun, but an attorney that has years and decades of experience. There is a special kind of value in that. And are you even aware of that value that you're bringing to the table of people that you're coaching?

Speaker2:
I think so. I certainly believe that it gives me a level of experience which I can bring. And my intention is that I'm going to be coaching people who are in a similar position to B or at least a similar position to where I was. I understand the legal market here in the UK quite well, very well. I know what people are experiencing. I know what expectations people have. I know how law firms operate. I know how they could operate better. So there's this. I'm sure you and your viewers are aware of the sunk cost fallacy. You know, this idea that I've been doing this for 20 years, why on earth would I give up 20 years of experience as a lawyer to start doing something else entirely? Well, the answer to that is not I might not necessarily be using the technical knowledge and practice that I've built up, but the years of experience I've got of knowing what the job entails and the the other skills that you pick up, that communication, that kind of thing. Yeah, there's, there's an awful lot which I'm going to be able to draw on in a coaching practice and also. Give to other people who are in a similar position to me.

Speaker1:
Yes, I. I so agree with you on that. No, the the 20 years is not thrown away. The 20 years just add so much goodness and value and knowledge to what you are bringing to the table. Because let's talk about coaching real quick. This is a very important topic of how I feel because I'm a coach and I'm a professional certified coach and I serve on the International Coaching Federation. I coach other coaches, I certify other coaches. And over the pandemic, it's funny, Jeremy, and I'm pretty sure you can speak to that. A lot of coaches have come out of the woodwork. They're like, Oh, I know a thing or two about coaching. Let me be your coach now. I can appreciate that and imagine someone says, Oh, I know a thing or two about law. Let me become a lawyer. Oh yeah, that would not fly that you don't you don't just become a lawyer by having a great idea of, oh, I know a little bit about law, let me become a lawyer. There's so much that goes into that. Do you want to speak to that?

Speaker2:
You're absolutely right. And certainly, I mean, lawyer is one of those things. You can't call yourself a lawyer unless you've had the qualifications and the certifications and everything. And coaching isn't like that, but that certainly doesn't take away from the skills that coaching involves. And yes, anyone can call themselves a coach and some people call themselves a coach. When I would say that it's not necessarily coaching is what they're doing, I think. People tend to confuse coaching with other things, like teaching, like mentoring. So you might find someone who markets themselves as a coach and what they're actually doing is saying, Here is what I do. Copy me and you will enjoy similar success. And to me, what I've learned about coaching is that really is not what coaching is about. Coaching really is about helping the person you are coaching. Draw their own answers and come to their own conclusions. And yes. And whilst I certainly haven't yet gone through all the professional training and qualifications, which I know is out there for coaching, and it's very much my intention to do that. I've made sure that I've started to do a lot of reading and a lot of listening to podcasts all around coaching so that I can get into the, the essence of that. It's, it's like I said, it's what compliments podcasting so well, it's being curious, it's asking questions and it's going beautiful. That's interesting. What makes you say that? Diving into that stuff that makes it's just so fascinating.

Speaker1:
And wouldn't you agree, as an attorney, you're often you have to be very curious and kind of go in and dig a little bit as well. So there's there is that overlap of strategies that you might be using from one area of expertize into another. And yet you bring so much goodness to the table, so much value. In looking back the Jeremy in April of 2022 and looking back to the young Jeremy, when you perhaps started going to law school, you just became a young attorney. Lawyer, what what would you tell yourself or if you could carry any resource with you back to that young Jeremy, what, what would you take to that Jeremy? What would you tell him or give him?

Speaker2:
The thing I think I wish I'd known sooner was what I was saying earlier that there can be more to a career than just math. I I've changed jobs a couple of times, and it's always been an improvement. It's always been to something which I've been happier doing. But I realize now that I probably could have concluded sooner. That's. Perhaps an entire 40 year career in law wasn't for me, and there were ways and means that I could have figured out sooner. What alternatives might be out there now? Obviously, I'm here now where I am. It's not as though I can turn back time, but. I guess the message that I'd like to get out to people is that. There are always these options and people will very easily come up with reasons why they can't go through some kind of a career change. Usually it's around, Oh, I'm earning this much, and we've got the mortgage and we've got a certain standard of living and got kids to pay for and all that sort of stuff. And people get just stuck in this mentality of, Oh, I can't change because I've got all these obligations. And what I want to encourage people to do is, well, you know, okay, that might be right, but have you tested it how you explored it? Have you looked to see what else might be out there? Have you considered maybe what you might be better suited for? Have you done any work on yourself to figure out where your strengths are, where your preferences are, where your values are? Why not? Start doing some of that work and see where it takes you.

Speaker2:
You're not making any commitments. You're not saying, I am going to quit my job next week. You've got an opportunity to do this work and figure out what it means to you. Does it mean where you really are in the wrong career you need to make some massive changes? Or does it mean that there's just a few tweaks here, a few tweaks there? Is it mindset as much as anything? You know, I know in your area of expertize and OPI, there's a lot of talk about reframing things. Is it a case of reframing something in your mind which. Once you you go through that reframing exercise, things just seem a bit better than they were. So, yeah, it's I think there is reluctance to recognize that you've got the opportunity to do that, and I would encourage people to take that opportunity with both hands.

Speaker1:
Yeah. And it's easy said, right. So Brian actually asked the question here in the chat box. He says, How do you think people are scared or even yourself in transitioning from one or out of the job or into something else? Do you think that there's fear plays a big role?

Speaker2:
Absolutely. There's in fact, one of my guests explained it much better than I'm about to. But he described, I think, what is there? There's there's fear of failure. I mean, how you define failure when you don't know what success looks like, I'm not sure. But, you know, you've got this fear of failing yourself, failing your family, failing other people. And you've got a fear of the unknown. There's you know, there's a lot of comfort in familiarity when you've been doing a job for ten, 15, 20 years. You know the ropes. And it's it's comfortable and getting out of that. Just contemplating something completely different is uncomfortable. It leads to uncertainty. It starts to raise questions. The. The vigilance part of your brain starts to go, but hang on, you're not going to get paid. You're going to suddenly need to pay for education. You're going into something that you don't know what you're doing. So. Yeah. There's absolutely fear. Did I have fear when I started down the process? Absolutely. But I guess there's ways that I've managed that fear. One of which is not by going all in straight away, I'm still very much in transition.

Speaker2:
I still practice law. I've still got my job as a lawyer. I'm doing this alongside it with a view to transitioning out. It means that I'm going perhaps more slowly than I might otherwise have done. But it's comfortable. It's exactly. It's it's what works for me. I did speak to a coach who said that there is a lot to be said for burning the boats. So this was, I think, a reference to some battle that the Romans fought when they would have to sail out to an island and defeat who was ever there. And but the boats were always there, so they never defeated them. And then they went back. But when they burnt the boats, then they did defeat the enemy because they didn't have any choice. The boats were burnt. So. I can definitely see that that can work, but it's not necessarily right for everyone. And it wasn't right for me at the time. And yeah, I think you've just got to. You've got to push yourself, but recognize that you don't necessarily have to push yourself all the way at the start at the outset.

Speaker1:
What you're saying is that everyone has a different path, that it's not one fits all.

Speaker2:
Completely. Completely. And you can say that about. Almost everything. So you talk about your show, the success patterns show. The most important thing for me is in how you define success. Everything is in your own definition. What is successful for you? What is comfortable for you? What is dangerous for you? It's all about understanding yourself. And if people would take a little bit of time doing that, understanding themselves, then, well, I think everyone would be more powerful than they realize.

Speaker1:
Hmm. And there's you said there's comfort in familiarity. And when you are going on the journey of exploring, who who are you really? Who in your identity are you? And what am I here to do? What is my purpose here? Taking all of that information and all of the richness of it? What would you say is your. Most driving success pattern because we all have it. Most of us are not even aware that we have it or that we're driving it, or if it's not a success pattern, might be a limiting pattern that it's driving us. But what is the success pattern that you have identified and acknowledged for your own?

Speaker2:
Now. That's a really good question.

Speaker1:
You know, a good coach, you know, a good coach when that when that statement comes up. That's a really good question.

Speaker2:
I actually mark it as a successful point in an interview. If I cause a guest to pause and go, Oh, that's a really good question. The thing that has or the thing that I think is going to indicate success for me. Is going to be living and honoring my values. And I know a mentioned values a couple of times before, but it was only really quite recently that I had an appreciation as to what they are and how much they motivate you. And and it was interesting because I tried one or two other business ideas before I decided I was going to go the coaching route one which was in the podcast space, sort of providing a fixed price done for you. Transcription service, which I was convinced then and I still remain convinced, is a great business idea. There's definitely demand for it. If you can spin it up to it in sufficient quantity at the right price, then it's a really potentially very successful business model and it was something that I was doing anyway in terms of transcription for my own podcast and I actually got as far as starting to sell it, but it just didn't feel right. It it wasn't filling me with joy. It was kind of making me go, Oh God, you know, just, yeah, this is a good business out there, but I'm just not enjoying it. And it was only once I'd done some values work and I realized how much I value things like community collaboration, really speaking to other people, having the conversations that I realized, oh yeah, no, that's that's why it wasn't working for me, because it wasn't giving me that. So success for me will be. What's now, I've got a much clearer idea of what my values are. It's going to be living them. It's going to be honoring them. And that's going to be different for everyone, because everyone is going to have a different set of values.

Speaker1:
Yes. Yeah, exactly. Oh, I love that. And and I so appreciate that you're like pausing. Oh, that's a really good question. And and that it's coming back to your values because that's who who you truly are and what you stand for. And that's. And that all in itself is a pattern. And that is different to each and every person. Jeremy How do people get to listen to your 128 plus episodes? How do people get in touch with you?

Speaker2:
The best place to find everything for me is on my website. It's change, work life. Change, work life is all one word. There's no hyphens or anything like that. So change, work life dot com. There's a links there to my profiles on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, there's a contact page there. So anyone who wants to get in touch, I will reply to all messages unless they are spammy sales messages, which I do occasionally get. But if it's a genuine message, I will absolutely reply. All of my podcast episodes are available on the website. You can listen there or I'm on basically anywhere you can find podcasts. So I'm on all the usual places Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon music, you name it, you can find me there. But as I say, the hub for everything is at change. What? Lipscombe And yeah, if anyone is interested in being coached by me, if you've listened to me and thought, yeah, that bloke sounds like someone I could listen to or I could work with, then yeah, just fill out the contact form on our website. I'd be delighted to hear from you.

Speaker1:
Yes. Get in touch with Jeremy. He's an amazing, wonderful, knowledgeable individual with a big, big heart. Change, work life outcome is the way that you get a hold of him. Jeremy, thank you so much for being here and sharing, giving us a little bit of insight into your world and sharing your wisdom and your knowledge with us. Thank you for being here.

Speaker2:
Now. My absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for having me on.

Speaker1:
Absolutely. And for everyone that is on and is making a note of Jeremy's contact information, change, work mlive.com also get your success patterns checklist, your success patterns checklist at bit dot lee. So a bit lee slash center of an LP. That's our little gift to you. As I have promised you a gift at the end of this show. Get your success patterns checklist right here at Lee Slash Center of NLP and we would love to see you again next week as we tune in to another episode of Success Pattern Show with another great guest expert. See you next week. Tuesday, same time, same place. Thank you for tuning in to the Success Pattern Show at WW. The Success Pattern Showcase. My name is Brigitta Farley.

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Jeremy Cline

Jeremy is the host of Change Work Life, the podcast that’s all about beating the Sunday evening blues and enjoying Mondays again. Through interviews with ordinary people who have taken action to change the path of their career, and the career coaches who helped them, Jeremy explores the changes anyone can make to enjoy a better working life, whether these changes are small alterations to day-to-day routines, major career shifts or something in between. After 15 years spent largely furthering other people’s dreams, Jeremy started to wonder whether he was going to end his career thinking, “Really? This is what I did with forty years of working life?” And so he started the Change Work Life podcast to find out what alternatives were out there.

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