Special Guest Expert - Braxton Matson

Special Guest Expert - Braxton Matson: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Braxton Matson: this eJwdjl1vgjAUhv8KORe7QiuIjJGYZZ9myUyWuN14Q5r2gJ2l7dqDSIz_feDt-_G87wWENYSGKhocQglPEIMygbgRWCkJ5XK5KJIsS2IQXSDbdgH9zUjzJM9WaQxcCNuNhFu6eFgl9zHUCrWsDG8nZq00jthjz30ToLxA5_UoH4hcKBnr-37eWNto5E6FubAtk16dkJ1SNlUDS37FIi-8HMzHodlv083Xn3jdz7yoh--X9-Nn9sg1rVuUit8F23mBa2l7oy2XP-NUDKRIT092DoXiOtp0GCh6Ozv0FM2iZ8_PZE205RSsGfO19S2nsdC6DK7XfxVmYwU:1nzKV6:kuBYh6ndM0B1c2S71PjPT1f-jJg video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Here's the big question. How is it that most entrepreneurs hustle and are always busy and struggle to take just one step forward, only to fall two steps back their dedicated, determined and driven, but only a few finally break through and win. This show uncovers those quantum leap patterns of highly successful people so you can simply model what they do and apply to your future success. That's the question. And the answers are right here. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle and this is the Success Pattern Show. And you know it. Welcome everyone to the Success Pattern Show. My name is Brigitta Hoeferle where we are the success patterns movement where we put the do in learn do teach and boy oh boy are we going to learn a few things today by an incredible person, our guest expert and I'm going to introduce him in just a little bit. Now, my name is Bridget Fallon, the CEO of the Center of NLP. And people ask me, so success patterns, huh? So success patterns. Well, let's decipher it. A pattern is an example for others to follow what I teach within the center of NLP. One of the laws of success is that anything can be, once it is modeled, can be followed. So the success part is in that is everyone has success somewhere in their life. Success is a interesting thing, if you will. That's a technical term because it shapes its meaning with each individual person and it's not limited to one specific area or to only business or to only finance or to only personal life and happiness or whatever it may be. It is a it can morph its meaning from person to person. Here in the success pattern show, we give you the scaffolding to build your own empire, to build your own successes wherever you are looking for, to build them. Because within this show, we are decoding the patterns that led to success of our guest experts. So you can then as you're watching that and as you're taking notes, encode your success today as humans were hardwired for hands on application by a living teacher, because clearly we're not just talking a good game. We're actually walking the walk with our grand masters at work here.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
And you're about to get some really good tips on how to model success, which means that you're at the right place at the right time. So let's go ahead and claim success because it is already yours. The guest expert that we have today is bringing a perspective to this show. And he says, no matter where you are in life, we always have an opportunity to pursue a purposeful one, to pursue a purposeful life. He's a I'm going to say, a research and development genius. And that's part of his own personal growth, because he says developing yourself, improving yourself, pouring into your self, in your own life, in your business. That is the biggest part in research and development play. Always play a big game, but that is his wheelhouse. It has helped him on his pursuit to magnificence. Now he's the co host and the editor of Mediocre to Magnificent Podcast and the research and development technician at Low Temp Inc. And he is one of the incredible, beautiful people that continues to be on a journey of never ending improvement. And I cannot be more excited and honored to have him on my show. Braxton Matson, come on out, my friend.

Braxton Matson:
Thank you, Brigitta. Thank you so much. Thank you. It's an honor to be here. It's an honor.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
It is an absolute honor to have you here. And as I was reading your your bio and what you sent in, I was like mediocre to magnificent. Wait a minute. That's Lee Williams podcast. That's that's that's what he stands for. And Lee and I go way back. If you've listened to that episode, you know a thing or two about Lee and I and I am so thrilled. Little did I know, but I'm so thrilled that you and Lee are a working together and that he's introduced us and that you're here on the show with us.

Braxton Matson:
Yes. That's it's an awesome opportunity. Like when you when you gave me the opportunity to I was like, I've got to take it like it's it's a it's there's no there's no no. That's got to be a yes.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So absolutely. What it's it's interesting that you say that because my concept in that and my strategy is the answer's always yes. Now, what's the question?

Braxton Matson:
There you go. Yeah. And I think that's how you have to look at it. Like with research and development, you're constantly having to develop yourself and you have to research it to do that. And. I mean, it's it's so key. And you can't say no when it comes to your yourself, your internal self and just developing yourself for the for the greater good and being able to share that on the podcast that we do is it's just it's amazing to me.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So now, unfortunately, there are people that say that are saying no to developing themselves and pouring into themselves and allowing themselves to be just yet a bit of a better version today than they were yesterday. Why do you think people are so reluctant to that?

Braxton Matson:
I think it's its perspective, I think is a good way to put it. Like when I was when I was growing up, I didn't really I was kind of just like. Just get through school, kind of, you know, get a job kind of thing. But as I got older, you kind of get this this like there's more to it than just doing that. And that's where the development side, because I was always so interested in wondering how things work, how things operate. Why did it happen this way? And for. For me, it was more of a lack of perspective that I had. That I had actually gained and wanted to learn, you know? You know, sometimes I don't like confrontation and. Really when you think about it, confrontation is really an opportunity to grow and improve the uncomfortability of it. Is kind of what people don't really want to deal with. And that was something that I had to learn. I had to I had to learn to be uncomfortable because that's where the growth is at. That's where the growth is for you. And that's where the growth is for you to share your story to help other people. And doing that. And that's that was huge for me.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So when you say you had to learn it, was there a time where it was like it almost sounds like there's a gap or a threshold or or a sudden stop of I actually I'm coming to this awareness and I have to that like there is no other way around. I have to.

Braxton Matson:
Yeah, I think it was I think it was when I got out of college because I went for a computer aided engineering stuff and, you know, I was working. A job and stuff like that. But it just got to a point where it just felt like you were just plateaued in a way. And I was like, There's just more to it. And as I got involved in other things, I was like, Whoa! We're not meant to be. Just doing stuff on our own. We're supposed to be sharing. And and supporting one another and building people up, building relationships. That's where it hit me was like, Yeah, I've got to I've got to improve on this. I've got to, I've got to research and develop myself. Because it just it just felt good when I did that. It just felt it felt magnificent. If you want to put it that way.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I hear you loud and clear. The research and development. So I'm getting a little insight of where little Braxton is coming from. Right. Not necessarily growing up with the supportive growth mindset of the of the magnificent mind set, but yet not wasting any time of when you became aware of it. Really going deeper into that on top of that. I heard you say earlier, you're always intrigued of how things work. Were you the kid that took the radio apart and try to put it back together?

Braxton Matson:
I mean, there's been so many times where I've taken things apart now. They may have not have gone back exactly the way they needed to be, but I did get to learn how they actually operated. You know, I messed around with cars, with my dad a lot learning, you know, and then the media hit and YouTube was like, if I had to fix something, I was like, I'm just going to like figure it out kind of thing. And it's kind of rewarding when you do that in a way, because it's like, Well, I accomplished something and and that's kind of how I took it was, you know, understanding how things work. It's just an interesting aspect to it. And it just it reaps accomplishment for me when I can do that.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So so from that and really not fighting who you are in your characteristics and your persona in your personality, but really embracing it. That's what it sounds like, that you've embraced every part of you and now you've gone into research and development and you're pouring that into the mediocre to magnificent podcast as well. Was it again another kind of eureka moment of This is what I'm going to do because I am so intrigued and I want to do more. I want to go deeper into research and development. How did that come about?

Braxton Matson:
Really? Honestly, it was it was my my faith growing up. I didn't really have a lot of we didn't do a lot of like going to church. And then as I got, you know, married, my faith is what really? Really brought me to a point where it's like like I need to tap into this more because that's it's been a big. Like, that's something I can fall back on. Is my faith in any adversity that I have or any anything. I can fall back on my faith. And that led me to not only can I do research and development for the company I work for, but I can help people. Accomplish that same goal through the podcast, through what we're doing with the mediocre to magnificent podcast. And that was that. It wasn't a monetary value to me. It was more of like, you're providing value to people who need it and you're the voice. That you can resonate with them at their frequency. And it's like, why not take that opportunity to do that? And that's that's that's what it is. That's what what brought me to doing that, you know.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Braxton. I hear I hear that you have a lot of knowledge and that you have a lot of. You have a lot of drive to learn even more and not just point to yourself, but give give to others. And that giving to others. Peace does not happen here. It happens here. It happens in your heart. So what I'm as I'm listening to you, I'm also gathering the beautiful balance that is Braxton. That is huge knowledge and strategies and the the drive to know more of how things work and why are they the way that they are. And and can we question the status quo. But then also the the I want to pass this on to so many people. I want to I want to make a difference in people's lives. I want to be there so they can develop into who they want to be, who they not just want to be, but who they are, who they are in their essence and what they are here to do. Tell me more about that.

Braxton Matson:
I would definitely call that a ripple effect. The way you put that. It's when you can when you can be your authentic self and. Live like living. A good way to put it was we had we have a mastermind call every month. And one of the things that was brought up was the whole picture of like the guy that balances plates with the sticks and he's got it all. He's got like he's balancing it with his hands and his feet and everything. And, you know, outside it looks like, man, that's awesome. That's great. Internally. You know, he might be struggling to balance those plates. And at another point, it may be just effortless. He may be able to just balance and the plates could be anything from the eight M's that we talk about. It could be your lifestyle, it could be marriage. It could be finances. It could be your job. But. That's the outside. And then when you can get into the inside and you you really harness that internal self. That you are. Not only can you balance the plates, but it was put like it's more of like an extension of your arm. It's an extension of your legs. Like, it's it's just effortless. You can do that. And it's so crucial to have that internal, you know, you can say, my cup runneth over. You've got to fill your cup up. And that's that's where where that comes from for me is that's how I view it in a way. And it was that was a big one for me when we did the call now, and that really opened my eyes up a lot when we talked about that. So yeah, that's beautiful.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I think having that balance. Is crucial. For many reasons because it's easy to be all in your head or it's easy to be all in your heart. Right. But having that balance of both. That's critical. It's not just having the IQ or the IQ, it's having both. And I think it is much more important than IQ in my in my model of the world and in my view, with all of the things that you have said so far and the things that you've been doing in your life. What would you say is one thing? That you wish you had learned a lot earlier in your life.

Braxton Matson:
Get out of your head. There it is again. Get out of your head. Yeah, there's there's some things where it's like you don't have to be that detailed. You know, I think our you know, my pastor would say, you know, be where your boots are and then just keep moving forward. And it's like, you know, the devil is not in the detail. Like, just just some things. You just have to just do it. Just just do it. It's going to work out. You ain't got to be consumed with the details and you ain't got to worry about the details because it's going to work out itself. That's kind of what I would tell myself back then.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Have you. So so then the next question. That is because you strike me as a very heady person, but yet you have that big heart centeredness as well. Is the heart centeredness something that you've always had or that you learned over your life?

Braxton Matson:
I think it's it's what I've learned over my life. I think I've always had it, but I didn't really, like, try to harness it until I started learning how to do that. You know, I was always up in my head all the time. You know, you've got to you've got to size up. You've got your heart and you got your head. And really, if you come from a place of love. You know, it's you can't beat that, you know.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
So do you find yourself overthinking stuff?

Braxton Matson:
Yeah. Yeah, I do. That's that's that's research and development in a in a nutshell. In a way.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
You're probably right. Yeah, but do.

Braxton Matson:
You?

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, go ahead.

Braxton Matson:
Yeah, it's just, you know, sometimes you just got to be able to file it away. It's like, okay, I can. I can deal with this later.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
But stay with your boots. Yeah. In in that you might have heard the six human needs that Tony Robbins has developed over the years. And two of the six human needs is certainty and uncertainty or variety and certainty. Where would you place yourself more? What do you appreciate? More variety or certainty?

Braxton Matson:
It depends on what it is. If you were to ask if like, say, for for going out and eating. I like a variety. Like, I don't like doing the same thing every time. And I think that comes from like my dad's was in the army and we got to move around a lot. So we've been to South Korea, Germany. We've been there and. The cultures that you see, like it's everything is different. So that gives me a broader perspective of, of just different identities and things. But then with the certainty part, I think that's more with, you know. Like maybe the financial side or something like that, where I got to know the details of like, where am I going to? How are we going to get there? Or the logistics of a trip, that kind of thing is probably the certainty part that I would gravitate to. But when it comes to enjoyment. Uncertainty is probably the biggest thing for me on that one. You know, just living life in and. Doing things, you know, having the uncertainty is key because it allows you, expose you, exposes you. To things that you wouldn't necessarily expose yourself to when you're trying to be certain about something for sure.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
There's a so there's a deeper learning, there's a deeper insight in when you explore. Yes. The things that are uncertain now. Can we agree that we just came out of a time and maybe we're still somewhat in it? I don't know of uncertainty. How did you keep. How did you keep your I'm going to say positivity and I want to come back to positive positivity here later as well. How did you keep your positivity up? How did you keep your mind set up? How did you stay sane? Sane, if you will.

Braxton Matson:
I would have to say my faith, that was the biggest thing for me because at that time, my family did go through some some difficult trials during that period. And honestly, coming out of it, it just made my faith even stronger. And like I said, being able to fall back on that, on things of uncertainties like that was very crucial to just getting just being able to get through it and and come out on the other side of those things was huge for me. The faith was huge on that one.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
A believe that there's something much, much greater than yourself.

Braxton Matson:
Mm hmm. Yes, exactly. Like you can't. You can't lean on. You can't. Like I would always try to like do things on my own. And it's like God was telling me like, no, no, it doesn't work like that. Like, you've got to have you've got to have some faith in something that that you just you can't control. Like you've got to release the control of it and just let it be.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
The big C-word. Yeah, because quite frankly, we're not in control in the first place, right?

Braxton Matson:
Mm hmm.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
I talked about positive thinking and you strike me as someone that would be a person of I'm going to put it in quotation marks, positive thinking. But what? Can define positive thinking in your definition. What does it mean to you?

Braxton Matson:
It's something that uplifts you. If I was to put it for somebody to kind of understand it, there's like there's two things. There's two things in life that we do when it comes to relationships. And it's pretty cut and dry. You're either going to build somebody up or you're going to bring somebody down. And the positivity side of it is you're going to you want to always bring somebody up. Always, you know. And that includes yourself. And it's not easy. It's not easy because you're going to go through trials and stuff, but it's being able to get back to that and recognize that and just, you know, understand, hey, things happen, but you got to uplift yourself in those situations. That would be positivity to me. Is, is just that uplifting people not breaking them down.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Pouring into them. You're definitely seems like that that seems to be your success pattern that the knowledge and the goodness and the richness that you have that you're giving, that you're giving it fully and freely to others and you're not claiming it to be your your own. You're you're allowing it to flow through you onto and into others. You know, I said it earlier, success is an interesting thing because every every one defines it in a different way. But when do you know that you have success in anything that you do? What happens?

Braxton Matson:
I would I would say, you know, just getting out of bed is a success. I remember at work, somebody asked me like, you know. How are you? How are you feeling? I'm like, I'm alive, you know what I mean? And it's like, you've got to start your day off that way, you know, it's you know, when we talk about the Adams meditation in all kinds of forms is so crucial to having that and. Just just having that in itself. Is is what it would be for me. You know, it's it's that's the success is being to say, hey, I'm here and I'm showing up the way I want to show up. And if I don't, I recognize that and I can capitalize on improving. And that's the thing for me as far as what success is.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
For that. That's well, well and beautifully put, if you can say that there's a recurring strategy in. How you are approaching things, how are you approaching your research and development? How are you approaching marriage? How are you approaching you co hosting the podcast? Anything? Fill in the blank. Is there like an overarching? If this then that kind of strategy that you have become aware of that drives you.

Braxton Matson:
I think it's constantly improving, whether it be the podcast. My marriage lifestyle changes. It's always looking at it from a perspective of improvement. You know, you never want to you never want to be stagnated and. You know, constantly wanting to improve and tweak things, even if it's the littlest thing. Is is how I would look at it as as what I would do. As far as that, it's just a constant improvement. Always looking at it as How can I better. Create a bigger ripple effect and kind of reach other people. In understanding what their message is and everything. So.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
When you when you understand other people's message, what do you usually do with that?

Braxton Matson:
You got to share it.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Yeah, you got to say that. That's why I asked that question.

Braxton Matson:
You have. You have to. And that was the thing, like with me being on the show. I wouldn't be doing anybody justice if I didn't justice if I didn't share my story. You have to share your story. I mean, people benefit from that. And it's so crucial for a lot of people. And you just you don't even know it. And we have the technology now where you can reach millions of people and they can resonate. And, you know, it's like it's like if you just impact one person, one person. I mean, that makes that makes a world of difference.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
You know, I agree with you. I agree with you. What would you say? What is what is the parting phrase or words? Words or one word that you want to share with our listeners for today and the followers?

Braxton Matson:
I would say. Get after it. Stay after it. Be your authentic self. And just be magnificent, be the ripple effect of magnificence.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Those were beautiful words set from a very wise man. Braxton, thank you for taking the time of being here and really pouring not just your head, but your heart into us. Thank you for that, guys. I sure hope that you took some notes because there were incredible nuggets here from Braxton that he poured into us. Thank you for being here on this Tuesday. I will see you again next week, same time, same place for the Success Pattern Show. Braxton, take care.

Braxton Matson:
Thank you.

Brigitta Hoeferle:
Thank you for tuning in to the Success Pattern Show at www.TheSuccessPatternsShowcase.com My name is Brigitta Hoeferle.

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Braxton Matson

Research and Development is a vital part in my personal growth. It has helped me in the pursuit of my Magnificence. Co-Host and Editor of The Mediocre To Magnificent Podcast and R&D technician at LowTemp Inc, constant improvement has been key in my continued journey in life.

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